Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

It's a wonderland. Old Faithful and the majority of the world's geysers are preserved here. They are the main reason the park was established in 1872 as America's first national park an idea that spread worldwide. A mountain wildland, home to grizzly bears, wolves, and herds of bison and elk, the park is the core of one of the last, nearly intact, natural ecosystems in the Earth s temperate zone.

Yellowstone National Park Info


Yellowstone National Park

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News

Operations at Yellowstone during the government shutdown (12-22-2018)

In response to the lapse in federal appropriations, Yellowstone National Park is implementing its plan for a government shutdown.

Update to operations at Yellowstone during the lapse of appropriations (01-11-2019)

By Sunday, January 13, Yellowstone National Park will provide additional basic services during the lapse of government appropriations.

Timeline for Resumption of Operations at Yellowstone National Park

With the enactment of the continuing resolution, staff at Yellowstone National Park will resume regular operations beginning tomorrow.

Yellowstone National Park Photos

Upper Yellowstone Falls and Chittenden Memorial Bridge

petechar posted a photo:

Upper Yellowstone Falls and Chittenden Memorial Bridge

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
12:41 4 January 2019

"The Chittenden Memorial Bridge is a 120 feet (37 m) concrete and steel arch bridge across the Yellowstone River just upstream from the Upper Yellowstone Falls in Yellowstone National Park. First constructed in 1903 as a Melan arch bridge by park engineer Captain Hiram M. Chittenden of the US Army Corps of Engineers, the bridge was known as Chittenden Bridge from 1912 to 1963 when it was replaced with a more modern structure. " - Wikipedia

Golden eagle research subject & Dave Haines

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Golden eagle research subject & Dave Haines

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Golden eagle research subject & Dave Haines

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Golden eagle research subject & Dave Haines

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Golden eagle, red fox, and wildlife biologist (read the story)

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Golden eagle, red fox, and wildlife biologist (read the story)

Golden eagle research project
Yellowstone National Park

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

This eagle is golden

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

This eagle is golden

Here's a really good look at why these birds are called golden eagles.
In the arms of eagle researcher Dave Haines

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Eagle delivery service

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Eagle delivery service

This golden eagle was trapped and brought to the roadside for further examination.

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Hooden golden eagle

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Hooden golden eagle

Just a hint of gold at the back of the bird's neck.

Millennia ago falconers discovered hooding keeps raptors calm

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

"The eagle has landed"

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

"The eagle has landed"

In a manner of speaking
Yellowstone National Park golden eagle research subject delivered to the roadside

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Eagle delivery service

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Eagle delivery service

This golden eagle was trapped and brought to the roadside for further examination.

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Talons immobilized, golden eagle

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Talons immobilized, golden eagle

An eagles talons are not only long and sharply pointed, but the are attached to very strong feet. It's for the handler's safety that they are immobilized in this manner.

As I headed east through the area known as “Yellowstone Picnic” into Little America I came across a small crowd at a pullout with spotting scopes set up and cameras with long lenses pointed towards a spot far off the road to the north. I pulled over and looked through my binoculars. What should I see but a man with a fox dancing around his feet. My first through was, “What kind of idiot is that, going way out there and feeding a fox?!?!” Someone pulled up next to me and explained that the he was out there as part of a golden eagle research team. I still wasn’t able to put it together, but then he began skiing back to the road. As he neared it became clear that he had something large under his arm.
It turns out that there was a deer carcass (a winter kill – it’s not unusual for animals to drop dead from exposure and starvation in Yellowstone’s mean winters – or a wolf, mountain lion, or even coyote kill if the deer was sufficiently weak) attracting all the usual visitors. Golden (and bald) eagles are opportunistic carrion-eaters, so the researchers knew a goldie would show up sooner or later. The fox was just trying to defend its wonderful meal from that human who might be trying to steal it! Photo taken at an extreme distance in relation to my lens’s capabilities, but you can make out the fox and the net trap as well as the researcher. I believe the dark brown blob on the ground is the eagle.
My friends had seen two men skiing into that area before sunup (and had also concluded the men must be mad to be skiing in the cold, dark, pre-dawn). Apparently it was the two researchers going out to lay a bow-type net trap and finally, by 9 A.M., acquired their target when it came to feed.
The researcher brought the hooded eagle (a technique falconers have used for millennia that functions to keep the birds calm), with its dagger talons safely immobilized in an Ace bandage, and wrapped in a towel for warmth, back to the roadside. His colleague and project leader, Dave Haines, gave the small gathering a few minutes to photograph the bird before he and his colleague took it to a ranger station for banding, tagging, weighing and measuring, and overall examination and evaluation. It would be released when data collection was complete.

Trumpeter swan & cygnet, Yellowstone River, Hayden Valley

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Trumpeter swan & cygnet, Yellowstone River, Hayden Valley

There were two adults and this juvenile hanging together in the Yellowstone River. This is probably their cygnet from last summer that is still with its parents.

Yellowstone National Park

Blew out the whites so I could get everything else.

Trumpeter swan, Yellowstone River, Hayden Valley

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Trumpeter swan, Yellowstone River, Hayden Valley

Adult swan
Yellowstone National Park

The Morning Watch at Tangled Creek

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

The Morning Watch at Tangled Creek

Bald eagle, Yellowstone National Park

Daisy Geyser, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Dr. Doc posted a photo:

Daisy Geyser, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Daisy Geyser is characterized by it's angled plume as seen here during this eruptions. The bacterial runoff mats are also very colorful. Eruptions occur a couple of times a day.

"Bobby socks" trees at Tangled Creek

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

"Bobby socks" trees at Tangled Creek

Bobby socks trees are those that have been inundated by thermal runoff long after establishment. The minerals dissolved in, and the extreme acidity or alkalinity, of the water is incompatible with tree survival, but before the tree dies, the first couple of feet of the trunk turn chalky white from water drawn up, reminiscent of bobby socks we all wore in the 1950s and 60s.
Look closely at the bases of these standing snags in the cold early morning to see their socks.

Yellowstone National Park

Above the Madison

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Above the Madison

Snow-covered lodgepole pines on a rise above the Madison River
Yellowstone National Park

Mount Haynes and the Madison River

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Mount Haynes and the Madison River

Yellowstone National Park

Looking west along the Madison

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Looking west along the Madison

Donna for scale.
Yellowstone National Park

Bison bull along the Madison: ready for spring

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Bison bull along the Madison: ready for spring

Many of Yellowstone's bison migrate to lower ground - outside the park boundaries - in winter, where the snow isn't as deep and its easier to access what grass lies beneath. But others tough it out, remaining on the higher plateaus and using their massive heads to sweep snow aside for a few bites of dried out forage underneath.

Bison bulls eking out a winter meal

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Bison bulls eking out a winter meal

Many of Yellowstone's bison migrate to lower ground - outside the park boundaries - in winter, where the snow isn't as deep and its easier to access what grass lies beneath. But others tough it out, remaining on the higher plateaus and using their massive heads to sweep snow aside for a few bites of dried out forage underneath.