Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park lies in the northern part of Wyoming near the city of Jackson. In an area first inhabited by the native american tribe of the Shoshone's. It was first established in 1929 on February 26 which preserved the major peaks of the Grand Teton's. Grand Teton National park was named after the largest peak in this range. The park covers over 480 square miles and welcomes over 2.5 million visitors a year. Vistors take part in fishing, hiking, backing, and camping with just over 1,000 campgrounds. The park also hosts the only airport in any national park system. There are many lakes and rivers in the park and many were formed by glaciers. The largest lake in the park is Jackson Lake.

Grand Teton National Park Info


Grand Teton National Park

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News

Public Comment Encouraged for Concession Services Improvements with Upcoming New Contract

The National Park Service is encouraging public comment on an environmental assessment that examines proposed improvements that may be included in an upcoming concessions contract in Grand Teton National Park. The document, CC-GRTE001 Concessions Services Prospectus Development Environmental Assessment, is available for public review online at https://parkplanning.nps.gov/grte-001and comments are being accepted through June 22.

Public Comments Encouraged on Impacts of Potential Paving of Private Property Access Route

The National Park Service is encouraging public comment on an environmental assessment that examines the proposed paving of a private property access route known as Meadow Road within Grand Teton National Park.

Waters Open Throughout Grand Teton

Lakes and rivers that provide access to private and commercial vessels for floating, boating and fishing throughout Grand Teton National Park are open for the season beginning June 5. Local residents and visitors to Grand Teton National Park are reminded to do their part to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Those who recreate on park waters have a responsibility to drain, clean, and dry their vessel, as well as check fishing gear before launching in the park.

Grand Teton National Park Photos

_MG_3637 - Grand Teton National Park.

j. mercier posted a photo:

_MG_3637 - Grand Teton National Park.

Mount Moran and the Teton mountain range. Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

Three Pronghorns are Better Than One

grimeshome posted a photo:

Three Pronghorns are Better Than One

These three pronghorn antelopes have all their angles covered.

Log Cabin in the Tetons

grimeshome posted a photo:

Log Cabin in the Tetons

An uninhabited cabin with a great view of the Teton Range.

Baby grizzly bears!

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Baby grizzly bears!

Not sure if there is much on this earth that is cuter than baby bears. This foursome - impossible to get all of them fully visible and looking toward me at the same time! - belong of course to the "Queen of the Tetons," represented in this shot only by her rear end.

Grizzly sow (female) 399, as she's known by her wildlife management number, has been a celebrity in Grand Teton National Park since 2006 when she first appeared close to the road where visitors could watch her with, that year, three brand new cubs (cubs-of-the-year, aka, COYs). Since then she has reliably appeared in the same area after emerging from hibernation in a winter den safely out of view in the back country. Every three years she has produced a new litter of cubs, though as is typical with wild bears, some were lost before they reached maturity.

In the spring of 2020, 399 emerged with her largest litter yet, four brand-new COYs. While it's not unheard of for bears to have such large litters, 399 is 24 years old, quite the senior for a wild bear, but clearly still reproductively unusually healthy.

The tots are still so small that they nearly disappear in the sage until they stand up to get a look at the hundreds of two-leggeds peering at them from the roadside through the magnifying tubes of cameras with long lenses, binoculars, and spotting scopes. We must seem so odd to these wild babies, but their mother teaches them to keep a safe distance from us while staying just close enough to discourage any marauding predators, including male grizzlies, ironically, one of the greatest hazards to their young lives.

One of the most rewarding things about viewing 399 and her new young ones in June of 2020 is that in June of 2019 we saw and photographed the courtship between 399 and male grizzly 679, dubbed "Bruno" by his fans. Seeing the circle of life in the wild is one of the greatest pleasures we afford ourselves.

Sadly, as good a mother as 399 is, it's statistically unlikely all four COYs will survive to reproductive age. Until then, we hope against hope that they will continue to do well, and have a good summer in which they take in lots of nutrition to help them survive the coming winter in a den with their mother, ready to emerge, half grown, next spring.

Big Mama

markcoleman8 posted a photo:

Big Mama

Grizzly 399, 24 year old bear that had quadruplets this spring.

Bison, Grand Teton National Park. May, 2020.

Guillermo Esteves posted a photo:

Bison, Grand Teton National Park. May, 2020.

Originally published at www.allencompassingtrip.com/2020/7/3/3442/bison

Snake River Light

Ken Krach Photography posted a photo:

Snake River Light

Pronghorn Mother and Baby

grimeshome posted a photo:

Pronghorn Mother and Baby

A newborn pronghorn antelope with mother in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

Getting Close the the Camera

grimeshome posted a photo:

Getting Close the the Camera

As my wife was taking photos of a field of horses, the horse crept closer and closer until it put it's nose right up against the camera. She didn't see the horse and it startled her. When she reacted, that startled the horse, who jumped back, as seen in the other photo. Taken in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

Surprise!

grimeshome posted a photo:

Surprise!

When this horse came right up to my wife, who was photographing horses in a field, it startled her, which in turn startled the horse who jumped back! Taken in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

Bison, Grand Teton National Park. May, 2020.

Guillermo Esteves posted a photo:

Bison, Grand Teton National Park. May, 2020.

Originally published at www.allencompassingtrip.com/2020/7/2/3441/bison

Dressed in Velvet

laura's Point of View posted a photo:

Dressed in Velvet

Elk lose their antlers yearly sometime between mid-November to mid-December. They start to grow new antlers in April. This elk's antlers are already quite impressive in early July. He should have an incredible rack by the time they stop growing mid-August. His antlers are in full velvet right now. He'll shed his velvet when his antlers are done growing. Large bulls carry tremendous weight on their heads. Antlers can weigh up to 40 pounds. This guy, with his huge antlers, will surely dazzle the ladies during the annual rut in the fall.

What it's really like

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

What it's really like

Along Grand Teton National Park's inner road, in thecorridor between Moran Junction and Leek's Marina, shortly after, a few miles farther north, grizzly bear sow 399 and her four cubs had disappeared into the woods but thought to be trending in this direction. There were no actual bears in sight at this moment. I don't believe they ever came in to view at this spot.
People were desperate to get a look, and preferably, photos of the famous bear family, in spite of the drear and drizzle.

Bison, Grand Teton National Park. May, 2020.

Guillermo Esteves posted a photo:

Bison, Grand Teton National Park. May, 2020.

A bison bull walking along the side of a road.

Help, I'm posting pictures of 399 and her cubs and I can't stop!

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

Help, I'm posting pictures of 399 and her cubs and I can't stop!

Four baby grizzly bears are truly a sassy handful for their mother, 399.

Grizzly sow (female) 399, as she's known by her wildlife management number, has been a celebrity in Grand Teton National Park since 2006 when she first appeared close to the road where visitors could watch her with, that year, three brand new cubs (cubs-of-the-year, aka, COYs). Since then she has reliably appeared in the same area after emerging from hibernation in a winter den safely out of view in the back country. Every three years she has produced a new litter of cubs, though as is typical with wild bears, some were lost before they reached maturity.

In the spring of 2020, 399 emerged with her largest litter yet, four brand-new COYs. While it's not unheard of for bears to have such large litters, 399 is 24 years old, quite the senior for a wild bear, but clearly still reproductively unusually healthy.

The tots are still so small that they nearly disappear in the sage until they stand up to get a look at the hundreds of two-leggeds peering at them from the roadside through the magnifying tubes of cameras with long lenses, binoculars, and spotting scopes. We must seem so odd to these wild babies, but their mother teaches them to keep a safe distance from us while staying just close enough to discourage any marauding predators, including male grizzlies, ironically, one of the greatest hazards to their young lives.

One of the most rewarding things about viewing 399 and her new young ones in June of 2020 is that in June of 2019 we saw and photographed the courtship between 399 and male grizzly 679, dubbed "Bruno" by his fans. Seeing the circle of life in the wild is one of the greatest pleasures we afford ourselves.

Sadly, as good a mother as 399 is, it's statistically unlikely all four COYs will survive to reproductive age. Until then, we hope against hope that they will continue to do well, and have a good summer in which they take in lots of nutrition to help them survive the coming winter in a den with their mother, ready to emerge, half grown, next spring.

It's not advisable to sass your mother if she's a 350 lb grizzly bear

V.C. Wald posted a photo:

It's not advisable to sass your mother if she's a 350 lb grizzly bear

Four baby grizzly bears are truly a sassy handful for their mother, 399. I don't know what 399 was saying to the little one standing up in front of her, but you can tell from its gesture that it had no intention of obeying her. But you can be sure mother bears do have their ways of enforcing discipline. A quick swat or nip usually does the trick.

Grizzly sow (female) 399, as she's known by her wildlife management number, has been a celebrity in Grand Teton National Park since 2006 when she first appeared close to the road where visitors could watch her with, that year, three brand new cubs (cubs-of-the-year, aka, COYs). Since then she has reliably appeared in the same area after emerging from hibernation in a winter den safely out of view in the back country. Every three years she has produced a new litter of cubs, though as is typical with wild bears, some were lost before they reached maturity.

In the spring of 2020, 399 emerged with her largest litter yet, four brand-new COYs. While it's not unheard of for bears to have such large litters, 399 is 24 years old, quite the senior for a wild bear, but clearly still reproductively unusually healthy.

The tots are still so small that they nearly disappear in the sage until they stand up to get a look at the hundreds of two-leggeds peering at them from the roadside through the magnifying tubes of cameras with long lenses, binoculars, and spotting scopes. We must seem so odd to these wild babies, but their mother teaches them to keep a safe distance from us while staying just close enough to discourage any marauding predators, including male grizzlies, ironically, one of the greatest hazards to their young lives.

One of the most rewarding things about viewing 399 and her new young ones in June of 2020 is that in June of 2019 we saw and photographed the courtship between 399 and male grizzly 679, dubbed "Bruno" by his fans. Seeing the circle of life in the wild is one of the greatest pleasures we afford ourselves.

Sadly, as good a mother as 399 is, it's statistically unlikely all four COYs will survive to reproductive age. Until then, we hope against hope that they will continue to do well, and have a good summer in which they take in lots of nutrition to help them survive the coming winter in a den with their mother, ready to emerge, half grown, next spring.

Witness To Morning

MacDonald_Photo posted a photo:

Witness To Morning

©2020 Jamie A. MacDonald

Moulton Barn Sunrise

(Jay Andersen) posted a photo:

Moulton Barn Sunrise

Yup, another one of those cliche shots that I can't resist if I'm around Grand Teton National Park. John Moulton Barn on Mormon Row as the sun illuminates the barn.

Oxbow Bend Sunrise

RondaKimbrow posted a photo:

Oxbow Bend Sunrise

Grand Teton National Park - Classic shot of Oxbow Bend at sunrise. When I first arrived at this location, the fog was so thick you couldn't even see Mt Moran. Luckily the fog part as the sun rose to reveal this beautiful scene!!

ronda-kimbrow.pixels.com/

Four Grizzly Cubs

grimeshome posted a photo:

Four Grizzly Cubs

A fuzzy photo, this was taken at a distance but I still love the capture of these 4 grizzly cubs of Grizzly #399 in Grand Teton National Park.