Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas

Guadalupe Mountains National Park near Carlsbad, New Mexico in western Texas. The park was first established in 1972 on September 30 and is host to almost 160,000 vistors annually and covers almost 135 square miles. Canyons and sand dunes are the two natural features that draw visitors. The Mescalero Apaches lived in the area until around 1860 when people started heading west and building settlements. Guadalupe Peak is the highest point in the range and lies in Texas although part of the range spans into New Mexico. The park also contains some grassland and desert areas. McKittrick Canyon is a popular feature of the park and is known for it's beautiful display of foliage as it's deciduous trees during the transition from summer to fall.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park Info


Guadalupe Mountains National Park

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News

Cave Fossils Exhibition Opens in Carlsbad, New Mexico

Guadalupe Mountains National Park is partnering with the National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) for their Cave Fossils exhibition October 27, 2018 – February 1, 2019. The exhibition will feature an NPS exhibit Cave Paleontology and cave fossil specimens from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History collection in Washington, D.C.

Fall Historic Preservation Workshop at Pratt Cabin

Guadalupe Mountains National Park will close the historic Pratt Cabin in McKittrick Canyon for the second historic preservation workshop that will take place in 2018. The cabin will be closed from October 16th – 18th

Guadalupe Mountains Paleontological Resource Protection Conference for Law Enforcement

Guadalupe Mountains National Park and the National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) will offer a Paleontological Resource Protection Conference for local, state and federal law enforcement professionals. The conference will take place at the National Cave and Karst Research Institute, located at 400 Cascades Avenue, Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the John Heaton Building, located at 400-1 Cascades Avenue, Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park Photos

Feeling the burn

RPahre posted a photo:

Feeling the burn

A steady ascent on the Tejas Trail through a burnt area of The Bowl.

Dog Canyon stables - HFF!

RPahre posted a photo:

Dog Canyon stables - HFF!

There's no water in the Guadalupe Mountains, so backpackers have to carry what they need. You can get water at Pine Springs, the main visitor center and campground just off the highway, or from this remote campground at Dog Canyon.

We've stayed at Dog Canyon twice, and have never seen another camper. (On this visit, the road was washed out, so the only folks we might have seen were other backpackers.)

Found it!

RPahre posted a photo:

Found it!

The summit of Lost Peak (7831 feet, 2387m), with its summit register.

Spur to Lost Peak

RPahre posted a photo:

Spur to Lost Peak

This spur trail dies out in an unhelpful way. Find a point to turn right and go uphill cross-country to the summit.

Gypsum dunes

RPahre posted a photo:

Gypsum dunes

This view points toward El Paso and Juarez, neither visible in the haze.

Radio repeater

RPahre posted a photo:

Radio repeater

Some Park Service infrastructure on the summit of Bush Mountain, the second-highest peak in Texas.

Fossils

RPahre posted a photo:

Fossils

The Guadalupe Mountains are part of a huge coral reef in West Texas. It's easy to find fossils, usually grouped in bands in the rock.

It looks like there are some crinoids here, mixed in with a lot of something else.

Improve my identification:
www.nps.gov/gumo/learn/nature/upload/fossil_guide.pdf

Fusulinids?

RPahre posted a photo:

Fusulinids?

These fossils resemble some of the fusulinids in the park's identification guide:
www.nps.gov/gumo/learn/nature/upload/fossil_guide.pdf

Agave detail

RPahre posted a photo:

Agave detail

Juniper berries - HBW!

RPahre posted a photo:

Juniper berries - HBW!

Contrasts

RPahre posted a photo:

Contrasts

We're on the Tejas Trail, looking across a canyon to Guadalupe Peak.

This side of Guadalupe Peak is mostly north-facing. The Tejas Trail faces mostly south -- so you get hot sun up a grueling steep trail.

The contrasts in vegetation are pretty obvious.

Windswept

RPahre posted a photo:

Windswept

The park had issued an advisory for winds up to 90mph (145 kmh), but I'm pretty sure we didn't experience anything over 60mph (97 kmh).

This is Bush Mountain, the second-highest peak in Texas. After a fairly windy night, we got blasted hard while crossing a saddle the next morning.

Silver-spotted Skipper

fractalv posted a photo:

Silver-spotted Skipper

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Thanks to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/10080687@N04] I now believe this to be
Silver-spotted Skipper, Epargyreus clarus

Unidentified Flower

fractalv posted a photo:

Unidentified Flower

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Alpine Cancer-root

fractalv posted a photo:

Alpine Cancer-root

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Thanks to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/ben_caledonia] I now believe this to be
Conopholis alpina; Alpine Cancer-root

Unidentified Flower

fractalv posted a photo:

Unidentified Flower

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Fringed Puccoon

fractalv posted a photo:

Fringed Puccoon

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Thanks to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/10080687@N04] I now believe this to be
Lithospermum incisum (Fringed Puccoon)

Cliff Fendlerbush

fractalv posted a photo:

Cliff Fendlerbush

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Thanks to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/10080687@N04] I now believe this to be
Fendlera rupicola; Cliff Fendlerbush

Mexican orange

fractalv posted a photo:

Mexican orange

Seen in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Salt Flat, Texas

Thanks to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/32930933@N02] I now believe this to be
Choisya Dumosa; Mexican orange

Taller than the mountain

RPahre posted a photo:

Taller than the mountain

A sotol plant between the Guadalupe Mountains and the deep blue sea.