Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas

Guadalupe Mountains National Park near Carlsbad, New Mexico in western Texas. The park was first established in 1972 on September 30 and is host to almost 160,000 vistors annually and covers almost 135 square miles. Canyons and sand dunes are the two natural features that draw visitors. The Mescalero Apaches lived in the area until around 1860 when people started heading west and building settlements. Guadalupe Peak is the highest point in the range and lies in Texas although part of the range spans into New Mexico. The park also contains some grassland and desert areas. McKittrick Canyon is a popular feature of the park and is known for it's beautiful display of foliage as it's deciduous trees during the transition from summer to fall.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park Info


Guadalupe Mountains National Park

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News

Fall Historic Preservation Workshop at Pratt Cabin

Guadalupe Mountains National Park will close the historic Pratt Cabin in McKittrick Canyon for the second historic preservation workshop that will take place in 2018. The cabin will be closed from October 16th – 18th

Guadalupe Mountains Paleontological Resource Protection Conference for Law Enforcement

Guadalupe Mountains National Park and the National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) will offer a Paleontological Resource Protection Conference for local, state and federal law enforcement professionals. The conference will take place at the National Cave and Karst Research Institute, located at 400 Cascades Avenue, Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the John Heaton Building, located at 400-1 Cascades Avenue, Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park’s 2019 Annual Youth Poster Contest

Guadalupe Mountains National Park announces its annual youth poster contest with this year’s theme - “Holey Landscape: The World of Caves and Karst.” This year, in partnership with the National Cave Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, we will be hosting several workshops and park events to provide opportunities for youth to learn more about caves and karst features. Check the park website at www.nps.gov/gumo to download a cave and karst education packet and for workshop and event dates. 

Guadalupe Mountains National Park Photos

Manzanita Spring, Smith Spring Trail, Guadalupe Mountains National Park 11/21/2013

ccbutch posted a photo:

Manzanita Spring, Smith Spring Trail, Guadalupe Mountains National Park  11/21/2013

"Look for birds, mule deer, and elk as you walk this loop trail to the shady oasis of Smith Spring. Take a break here and enjoy the gurgling sounds of the tiny waterfall before continuing around to sunny Manzanita Spring. Scars from wildland fires of 1990 and 1993 are evident along the trail. The trail is rated moderate, with a round-trip distance of 2.3 miles." www.nps.gov

"Guadalupe Mountains National Park is an American national park in the Guadalupe Mountains, east of El Paso, Texas. The mountain range includes Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at 8,749 feet, and El Capitan used as a landmark by travelers on the route later followed by the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line. The ruins of a stagecoach station stand near the Pine Springs visitor center. The restored Frijole Ranch contains a small museum of local history and is the trailhead for Smith Spring. The park covers 86,367 acres in the same mountain range as Carlsbad Caverns National Park, about 25 miles to the north in New Mexico." wiki

Salt Basin Dunes at Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Critter Seeker posted a photo:

Salt Basin Dunes at Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Gypsum sand dunes in Texas.

Guadalupe evening

My Americana posted a photo:

Guadalupe evening

El Capitan in the Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas.
051-4-2-3-1

A29C0731 here comes the rain

www.nightfocus.info posted a photo:

A29C0731 here comes the rain

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Approaching rain storm

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (3 of 3)

jimsawthat posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (3 of 3)

Guadalupe Mountains National Park is an American national park in the Guadalupe Mountains, east of El Paso, Texas. The mountain range includes Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at 8,749 feet and El Capitan used as a landmark by travelers on the route later followed by the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line. The primary attraction to visitors is the extensive trail system for hikers.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (2 of 3)

jimsawthat posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (2 of 3)

Guadalupe Mountains National Park is an American national park in the Guadalupe Mountains, east of El Paso, Texas. The mountain range includes Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at 8,749 feet and El Capitan used as a landmark by travelers on the route later followed by the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line. The primary attraction to visitors is the extensive trail system for hikers.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (1 of 3)

jimsawthat posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (1 of 3)

Guadalupe Mountains National Park is an American national park in the Guadalupe Mountains, east of El Paso, Texas. The mountain range includes Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at 8,749 feet and El Capitan used as a landmark by travelers on the route later followed by the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line. The primary attraction to visitors is the extensive trail system for hikers.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (11) -- near the Dog Canyon ranger station.

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (11) -- near the Dog Canyon ranger station.

Big-tooth maple (Acer grandidentatum) and yucca. There is also an Agave (Agave sp.) and a beargrass (Nolina sp.) in the right background. Hold your cursor over the photo to show boxes identifying them.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (9) -- Adjacent to Smith Springs

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (9) -- Adjacent to Smith Springs

Smith Springs is a natural spring in a narrow canyon where the water and deepness of the canyon provide moisture and less exposure to the sun to create a taller and more dense habitat with many trees. The colorful red, yellow and orange foliage is from big-tooth maple (Acer grandidentatum). This is in the Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (8) -- Adjacent to Smith Springs

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (8) -- Adjacent to Smith Springs

Smith Springs is a natural spring in a narrow canyon where the water and deepness of the canyon provide moisture and less exposure to the sun to create a taller and more dense habitat with many trees. The colorful red, yellow and orange foliage is from big-tooth maple (Acer grandidentatum). This is in the Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (6) -- Smith Spring

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (6) -- Smith Spring

Smith Spring is a natural spring in a narrow canyon where the water and deepness of the canyon provide moisture and less exposure to the sun to create a taller and more dense habitat with many trees. The colorful red, yellow and orange foliage is from big-tooth maple (Acer grandidentatum). This is in the Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (10) -- Near the Dog Canyon ranger station.

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (10) -- Near the Dog Canyon ranger station.

Big-tooth maple (Acer grandidentatum) and Agave.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (1) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (1) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail

In mid-November 2019, my wife and I took a short trip to visit Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, White Sands National Monument, and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, all in a small area of west Texas and southern New Mexico. I will post about 35 or so photos (a few at a time) from that trip over the next couple weeks or so.

Although Guadalupe Mountains NP is a sizeable property at over 86,000 acres, it is less developed and less accessible than many better-known national parks. Most of the park is accessible only by long hikes up into the high country. Our time at the park was limited to areas on the periphery, so we saw very little of the better scenery that is awarded to those who hike into the higher elevations of the park.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (7) -- Smith Springs sign

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Culberson County, Texas (7) -- Smith Springs sign

Smith Springs is a natural spring in a narrow canyon where the water and deepness of the canyon provide moisture and less exposure to the sun to create a taller and more dense habitat with many trees. This is in the Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (4) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (4) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

In mid-November 2019, my wife and I took a short trip to visit Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, White Sands National Monument, and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, all in a small area of west Texas and southern New Mexico. I will post about 35 or so photos (a few at a time) from that trip over the next couple weeks or so.

Although Guadalupe Mountains NP is a sizeable property at over 86,000 acres, it is less developed and less accessible than many better-known national parks. Most of the park is accessible only by long hikes up into the high country. Our time at the park was limited to areas on the periphery, so we saw very little of the better scenery that is awarded to those who hike into the higher elevations of the park.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (3) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (3) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

In mid-November 2019, my wife and I took a short trip to visit Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, White Sands National Monument, and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, all in a small area of west Texas and southern New Mexico. I will post about 35 or so photos (a few at a time) from that trip over the next couple weeks or so.

Although Guadalupe Mountains NP is a sizeable property at over 86,000 acres, it is less developed and less accessible than many better-known national parks. Most of the park is accessible only by long hikes up into the high country. Our time at the park was limited to areas on the periphery, so we saw very little of the better scenery that is awarded to those who hike into the higher elevations of the park.

There are three different kinds of clump-forming, spiky-looking plants in this photo. Hold your cursor over the photo to see boxes that identify what's what.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (2) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail.

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (2) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Spring trail.

In mid-November 2019, my wife and I took a short trip to visit Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, White Sands National Monument, and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, all in a small area of west Texas and southern New Mexico. I will post about 35 or so photos (a few at a time) from that trip over the next couple weeks or so.

Although Guadalupe Mountains NP is a sizeable property at over 86,000 acres, it is less developed and less accessible than many better-known national parks. Most of the park is accessible only by long hikes up into the high country. Our time at the park was limited to areas on the periphery, so we saw very little of the better scenery that is awarded to those who hike into the higher elevations of the park.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (5) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

Lee Casebere posted a photo:

Guadalupe Mountains National Park (5) -- Frijole Ranch area of the park along the Manzanita Spring/Smith Springs trail.

In mid-November 2019, my wife and I took a short trip to visit Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, White Sands National Monument, and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, all in a small area of west Texas and southern New Mexico. I will post about 35 or so photos (a few at a time) from that trip over the next couple weeks or so.

Although Guadalupe Mountains NP is a sizeable property at over 86,000 acres, it is less developed and less accessible than many better-known national parks. Most of the park is accessible only by long hikes up into the high country. Our time at the park was limited to areas on the periphery, so we saw very little of the better scenery that is awarded to those who hike into the higher elevations of the park.

The plant on the left side of the photo that looks much like a yucca is called Sotol (Dasylirion sp.). It was very common along this trail, far outnumbering the yucca.

NT19-57

tracktwentynine posted a photo:

NT19-57

NT19-49

tracktwentynine posted a photo:

NT19-49