Big Bend National Park, Texas

Big Bend National Park is located in western edge of Texas. The park is bordered by the Rio Grande river which separates it from Mexico. Temprature is the summer can frequently pass 100 Farenheight while the winter months can reach lows in the single digits. The park is home to over 1200 types of plants.

Big Bend National Park Info


Big Bend National Park

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News

Trespass Livestock Management Plan Finalized

A National Park Service plan to protect Big Bend National Park natural and cultural resources from the harmful effects of trespass livestock, primarily from Mexico, has been finalized.

Big Bend National Park Announces Entrance Fee-Free Days for 2019

Big Bend National Park will waive its entrance fee on five days in 2019.

Exotic Plant Management Plan Finalized

A National Park Service plan has been finalized to protect Big Bend National Park from the harmful effects of non-native plants, such as African buffelgrass, Lehman lovegrass, and tamarisk (saltcedar).

Big Bend National Park Photos

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brett.whitelaw posted a photo:

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One year ago, today, we were in Terlingua, Texas, visiting Big Bend National Park. Terlingua was once a mining town, now referred to as a ghost town, since the population is probably less than 100 people. It’s dry and dusty but quite unique and interesting. It is, actually, kind of a hippie town. Seems odd, right? A hippie town in Texas? Because Terlingua is so small, the main thing to do is to go down to “the porch,” which is a large porch attached to the only store in town, grab a beer, or several, and hang out with the locals. Actually, many musicians travel through Terlingua and they all gather on “the porch” and just jam. It’s pretty much a constant stream of good music. We CouchSurfed with a nice older gentleman named Ed. He introduced us around and gave us some great tips for our visit to Big Bend National Park (which is a stones throw away from Terlingua). We spent a day exploring the park, but we could have used several. We did several beautiful hikes. Here we are entering the massive Santa Elena Canyon which surrounds part of the Rio Grande. My friend waded through the water a bit, but I had had my fill of wet feet after hiking Seven Falls, so I didn’t join in. I think it would be pretty cool to rent kayaks and float down the Rio Grande, surrounded by the massive walls of the canyon.

Using the Balance Rocks to Frame a View of Big Bend National Park

thor_mark  posted a photo:

Using the Balance Rocks to Frame a View of Big Bend National Park

Greens, Browns and Blues (Big Bend National Park)

thor_mark  posted a photo:

Greens, Browns and Blues (Big Bend National Park)

I found using a Low Key and Graduated Neutral Density CEP filter in Capture NX2 brought about a richer set of color contrasts with nearby greens and yellows, the mountain browns and oranges and then blue and whites of the skies above.

Big Bend National Park - Lost Mine Trail

Stabbur's Master posted a photo:

Big Bend National Park - Lost Mine Trail

In May 1976, we camped for five days in Big Bend National Park.

One afternoon, my son, Branden, and I hiked the Lost Mine Trail.

Big Bend National Park - Lost Mine Trail

Stabbur's Master posted a photo:

Big Bend National Park - Lost Mine Trail

In May 1976, we camped for five days in Big Bend National Park.

One afternoon, my son, Branden, and I hiked the Lost Mine Trail.

Big Bend National Park

throgers posted a photo:

Big Bend National Park

Rio Grande Village area

Big Bend National Park

throgers posted a photo:

Big Bend National Park

Rio Grande Village area

Sierra Del Carmen

jb10okie posted a photo:

Sierra Del Carmen

Big Bend National Park,
Texas, USA

Spark Strung

Ramen Saha posted a photo:

Spark Strung

Art and Science, they say, are polar opposites that must not be forked together. One is intuitive, inductive, and sensory, while the other is analytical, deductive, and logical. They must be held apart, for they come from different places and evoke different things in the practitioner while suffocating and/or rewarding them in unlike ways.

Now, is that true?

Let’s take the example of the String theory – a theory, which at its crescendo, posits the existence of eleven dimensions around us: ten of space and one of time (M-theory). On the surface, string theory is the child of Science: an analytical idea that was deduced in a systematic and logical way. It divides all particles in the universe into two types: Bosons and Fermions, and from there, attempts to explore the universe at the highest level of abstraction. A dizzying prediction of such abstraction is that a staggering 10^520 universes (Multiverse) may exist folded within the theoretical ‘String landscape’ of 11 dimensions. Intuitively, such abstraction is useless for an artist, who often struggles to portray three regular dimensions within restrictions of the two dimensional canvas. Instead, imagine portraying all 11 dimensions on a flat surface… it is forbiddingly disorienting!

Disorientation is not limited to artists; scientists suffer at the hands of this theory too. The String theory cannot be experimentally proven, or more importantly, disproven. To many scientists, what cannot be tested is not science. Period. And yet, generations of physicists have pursued the String theory with a creative madness rivaled in intensity only by lunacy of geniuses like Beethoven, Schumann and Vincent van Gogh. So, who are these physicists working their paint in mathematical formalization for three decades trying to give birth to their ‘theory of everything’ in some tangible form? Are they scientists – because they are using impeccable mathematics in their art; or, are they artists – because they are applying their top creative sparks and imagination in their science?

So, at the risk of offending a few prigs and pundits, I will leave you with the idea that Science and Art are perhaps like Bosons and Fermions, which according to an even wilder version of string theory (Supersymmetry), are contained in one another: every Fermion has a Boson, and every Boson a Fermion.

Night sky @Chisos Basin

mnag62 posted a photo:

Night sky @Chisos Basin

Big Bend National Park

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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Nathan Cearbhall posted a photo:

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