Great Basin National Park, Nevada

Great Basin National Park is in the state of Nevada and lies near the cities of Ely, Border, and Baker in White Pine county. It's received it's name for the being the basin between the Wasatch and Sierra Nevada Mountain ranges. The park was established in 1986 on October 27 and stretches just over 120 square miles attracting over 90,000 visitors annually. There are over 800 types of plants in the park. The oldest living tree ever discover once stood in the park but was cut down in 1964 for research. A wide variety of wildlife exists in the park including multiple types of Rabbits, squirrels, and mice and larger mammals such as Mountain Lions, sheep, bobcats, and deer. Several species of trout are in the parks waters with the Bonneville cutthroat being the only native. Hawks, eagles, and swallows are just some of the types of birds found in the park. The features of the park were largely formed by volcanic and glacial activity. An extensive cave system made up of limestone and marble called Lehman caves can be found in the park. The caves were initially a national park of there own and were absorbed into the Great Basin National Park at it's establishment in 1986.

Great Basin National Park Info


Great Basin National Park

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GBNP Featured in New York Times

Great Basin National Park was featured in a travel article in the New York Times. The article was penned by Rachel Levin.

Snake Creek to be Closed for Treatment

Great Basin National Park will be conducting a stream treatment. To ensure the safety of Park visitors, Snake Creek Canyon will be closed from 9:00 am Monday July 23rd until 3:00 pm on Friday July 28th.

New Superintendent James Woolsey

The National Park Service has selected James Woolsey to serve as the next superintendent of Great Basin National Park in Nevada. He replaces Steve Mietz, who was promoted to superintendent of Redwood National & State Parks in California.

Fee Changes at Great Basin National Park Approved

The National Park Service has approved fee changes for cave tours and campgrounds within Great Basin National Park. The fee change will take place on January 1, 2018.

Great Basin National Park Photos

IMG_20190829_152311

JeremyADE posted a photo:

IMG_20190829_152311

Intrinsic

Bregalis posted a photo:

Intrinsic

beyond myth and math
knowing murmurs twine within

Resolute

Bregalis posted a photo:

Resolute

relentless resolve
honed by fierce wilderness winds
unyielding bastion
to match the millennia

Cloudy Sunrise at Great Basin

Duncan Rawlinson - Duncan.co posted a photo:

Cloudy Sunrise at Great Basin

Duncan.co/cloudy-sunrise-at-great-basin

Wild Bonsai 2

Bregalis posted a photo:

Wild Bonsai 2

Second in the series ‘Wild Bonsai’, this tree is twenty-four inches (610mm) in height and perhaps two-hundred and fifty years old.

'Wild Bonsai' is a numbered collection of photos of naturally occurring bristlecones generally less than three feet in height (914mm) and - as nearly as I can estimate - between fifty and five-hundred years old. Most will have sprouted and survived in tiny cracks and crevases or miniature basins of sand and gravel. Shaped by the elements, flourishing tenaciously in the most minimalist of conditions, their lives are measured not in millennia, but in centuries...often mere decades.

'Duality’, the cover photo for the accompanying album, is to me a matriarch of sorts and will remain unnumbered as a small token of a deeply intuitive and unapologetic respect that remains as transcendent and mysterious to me as it may seem odd to others. The essay that accompanies 'Duality' could, in many ways, apply as well to any other tree I may post in this series.

A perspective: Housed in the Tokyo Imperial Palace, the fifth oldest living cultivated bonsai in the world is something over 500 years old and is a designated National Treasure of Japan.

Raven Moon (an incantation)

Bregalis posted a photo:

Raven Moon (an incantation)

five millennia
under ravens watchful eye
waxing crescent moon
feathered myths of earth and sky
a tree yet living
while heedless time quickens by
fleeting conjunction
where fey doubts wither and die
transcendent moment
ancient visions rise and fly

Lecture

Bregalis posted a photo:

Lecture

emphatic gesture
point is to be understood
beyond any doubt

Entrance

greenschist posted a photo:

Entrance

Great Basin National Park, Nevada USA

Zeiss Ikon ZM
Zeiss Planar 50mm F2 T* ZM
Ferrania P30

Destiny

Bregalis posted a photo:

Destiny

from this beginning
imagine five thousand years

Stone Soup

Bregalis posted a photo:

Stone Soup

could it be too late
to learn what merest tree knows

‘Stone Soup’ is a folk tale in which a tattered traveler enters a village carrying nothing but a cooking pot. He is hungry and asks each villager he encounters for something to cook. All claim they have nothing to share. The traveler wearily finds his way to a nearby stream, dips water into his pot, plunks in a small stone, and sets the pot atop a cooking fire.

Soon a villager happens by and asks the traveler what he is cooking. “Stone soup,” the traveler replies and goes on to explain that stone soup is very delicious and, while he would be happy to share, the soup would be even better if it were garnished with a few vegetables. The villager hurries off, and soon returns with carrots. As word spreads, more and more villagers arrive bearing ingredients for the soup.

Such morality stories are often universal, have very old origins and, preceding writing, were passed from generation to generation - in one form or another - by oral tradition for perhaps thousands, of years. After each telling, eager listeners probably felt warmly sated and proud of themselves - just as if they had partaken of a particularly delicious stone soup to which they all, beyond any question, would certainly have contributed. In this current era, some might see the story as a possible riff on ancient creation myths (take stone, add water), but it is likely that many others would grumble and demur, viewing the ‘traveler’ as an ancestral one-percenter who would soon learn how to fill his pot with gold.

And while most of the villagers contributing vegetables and grains* to the proverbial stone soup probably had to soon move on to new lands because of the erosive loss of living soil caused by the rampant, catastrophic, destruction of sod for the cultivation of their crops, the bristlecone pictured here, growing on a substrate that has been sliding away naturally since the last glaciers melted, is gathering a stone soup of the most authentic and purest kind. A seasonally well-watered stone soup where roots and twigs and pine needles and microbes and fungi will subtly and silently confabulate in that mysterious, defiantly complex, more than two billion years old, alchemy which nurtures and sustains all terrestrial life. Eventually, with just a little luck, a bristlecone seedling may find sustenance here and the inevitable will be postponed for just a short while longer.

Walking through a grove of ancient bristlecones is often like walking across a tidal flat among cattywampus boats stranded by an outgoing tide. Only, the ‘flat’ is polished, sloped bedrock, the ‘boats’ are trees standing on tippy-toe roots or fallen at crazy angles, and the ‘tide’ is stone and rudimentary soil sliding inexorably out from under everything - and everywhere there are braided kelp-like stranded roots that lost contact with any semblance of living soil centuries, even millennia, ago.

It is said that loss of soil has been a major contributing factor to the demise of every great civilization that has ever existed - in an average of one thousand years. It is also said that even now soil is being lost around the world at a rate ten to one-hundred times the rate of replacement. Loss of soil is often the root cause (yes...I did;) of historic and contemporary involuntary migration. But soon there will be nowhere else to go** because - like a lot of other ‘pick-your-poison’ things we are hearing about these days - global soil is predicted to be seriously, irreversibly, depleted by the turn of this century.

In an analogous natural process that began about eight-thousand years ago in the Snake Range of Nevada, this is what is happening to high-altitude ancient bristlecones. Only, because bristlecones are - so to speak - at the top of their game, there is no ‘up’ to migrate to and, because of global warming, there is no ‘down’.

It is seductive to think of these scenic, millennia-old trees in terms of permanence - as something that, on the scale of a human lifetime, has been there forever and will be there forevermore. In reality, ancient bristlecones are a rare and very specific form of an almost metaphorically mundane and short-lived lower elevation tree (think Clark Kent) that long ago spanned the breadth of what is now sometimes referred to as the sagebrush ocean. That specific high-elevation form has pretty much served its purpose - which could be thought of as to be bountiful for a very long time in a place where not much else could, and (IMHO) become extraordinarily and inspirationally and hauntingly beautiful in the process. But even ancient bristlecones cannot flourish forever where the gift of opportunity slips constantly away.

Such trees are as transient as the soils that continue to slide away like a tide that will not return until eons after every one of them has fallen and only sparse bonsai versions of bristlecone have held on in cracks and tenuous bowls of rocky substrate for but a short while longer. The irony of this high-elevation situation is that lower elevation forests are generally the best builders, sustainers and stabilizers of soil on the planet. But no need to rush, trees that are yet living will frequently remain standing for a thousand years or more after they die - indelibly graceful and dignified to the very end.

Human nature is...well...now...regrettably...it is largely what defines Nature and, as such, could equitably be described as being that of a failed species. At the very least - especially the last 500 years - as that of a failed culture over eight-thousand years in the making.***

And so, as this era of heroic ancient trees - whose roots are, in the end, no match for flowing stone - is replaced by an era of trees the stature of bonsai, I sometimes envision a distant future when a seeker - wandering serene and alone among these diminutive and diminished groves - becomes aware of an eerily familiar sound and, kneeling gently before a tiny, isolated, wind-tousled tree, leans in closer and closer until finally - listening intently, hair brushed back from the ear, forehead almost touching the earth - she hears, emergent from the tree’s flittering, glistening branchlets, a softly whooshing exhalation that seems to whisper in exultation a dimly-remembered and once dismissive refrain from a darker human time long, long ago:
whhoosshhhh...ookaaaboommrrrrr...whhoosshhhhh...
. . . . .

*‘Wheat is Why’: The answer to every question you ever may have asked about who we are and how it came to this. Really.
**...unless you are in a position to hitch a ride to Mars with Bezos or Musk (see: ‘Full Disclosure’) - A cautionary tale: Within a just a few generations, stranded descendents of Easter Island aquanauts had lost both the technological legacy and the resources that would have enabled them to leave. Their fate was to stay and compete directly with the descendents of stowaway rats.
***It could be just a coincidence that this number is almost the same as the number of millennia substrate has been sliding off Snake Range ridges. (But, in fact, humankind has been struggling mightily with the 'coincidence' conundrum even unto today. Answers range from ‘everything’ to ‘nothing’.) Bottom line: Snake Range bristlecones have been slowing erosion for close to 8000 years, civilization has been accelerating it globally for more than 8000 years. Slowing wins.

(Full Disclosure: Because I live in a rural area and have been gouged my entire life by local merchants, I am a huge fan of Amazon/Prime. In addition I have an online subscription to the Washington Post. But I will never welcome Alexa into my life. Ditto a Cybertruck.)

mutillid, f, back, Millard county, Utah_2019-10-21-18.32.12 ZS PMax UDR

Sam Droege posted a photo:

mutillid, f, back, Millard county, Utah_2019-10-21-18.32.12 ZS PMax UDR

Great Basin National Park. Still processing photos from our big survey of bees of U.S. parks. In this case, there was a lovely mutillid wasp, (velvet ant) in the sample. Oddly the female's hair color shifted between the shots....Not clear why.
~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~

All photographs are public domain, feel free to download and use as you wish.


Photography Information:
Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200

We Are Made One with What We Touch and See

We are resolved into the supreme air,
We are made one with what we touch and see,
With our heart's blood each crimson sun is fair,
With our young lives each spring impassioned tree
Flames into green, the wildest beasts that range
The moor our kinsmen are, all life is one, and all is change.
- Oscar Wilde


You can also follow us on Instagram - account = USGSBIML

Want some Useful Links to the Techniques We Use? Well now here you go Citizen:


Best over all technical resource for photo stacking:
www.extreme-macro.co.uk/

Free Field Guide to Bee Genera of Maryland:
bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Basic USGSBIML set up:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

USGSBIML Photoshopping Technique: Note that we now have added using the burn tool at 50% opacity set to shadows to clean up the halos that bleed into the black background from "hot" color sections of the picture.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdmx_8zqvN4

Bees of Maryland Organized by Taxa with information on each Genus
www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/collections

PDF of Basic USGSBIML Photography Set Up:
ftp://ftpext.usgs.gov/pub/er/md/laurel/Droege/How%20to%20Take%20MacroPhotographs%20of%20Insects%20BIML%20Lab2.pdf

Google Hangout Demonstration of Techniques:
plus.google.com/events/c5569losvskrv2nu606ltof8odo
or
www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c15neFttoU

Excellent Technical Form on Stacking:
www.photomacrography.net/

Contact information:
Sam Droege
sdroege@usgs.gov



301 497 5840

mutillid, f, right side, Millard county, Utah_2019-10-21-18.39.17 ZS PMax UDR

Sam Droege posted a photo:

mutillid, f, right side, Millard county, Utah_2019-10-21-18.39.17 ZS PMax UDR

Great Basin National Park. Still processing photos from our big survey of bees of U.S. parks. In this case, there was a lovely mutillid wasp, (velvet ant) in the sample. Oddly the female's hair color shifted between the shots....Not clear why.
~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~

All photographs are public domain, feel free to download and use as you wish.


Photography Information:
Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200

We Are Made One with What We Touch and See

We are resolved into the supreme air,
We are made one with what we touch and see,
With our heart's blood each crimson sun is fair,
With our young lives each spring impassioned tree
Flames into green, the wildest beasts that range
The moor our kinsmen are, all life is one, and all is change.
- Oscar Wilde


You can also follow us on Instagram - account = USGSBIML

Want some Useful Links to the Techniques We Use? Well now here you go Citizen:


Best over all technical resource for photo stacking:
www.extreme-macro.co.uk/

Free Field Guide to Bee Genera of Maryland:
bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Basic USGSBIML set up:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

USGSBIML Photoshopping Technique: Note that we now have added using the burn tool at 50% opacity set to shadows to clean up the halos that bleed into the black background from "hot" color sections of the picture.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdmx_8zqvN4

Bees of Maryland Organized by Taxa with information on each Genus
www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/collections

PDF of Basic USGSBIML Photography Set Up:
ftp://ftpext.usgs.gov/pub/er/md/laurel/Droege/How%20to%20Take%20MacroPhotographs%20of%20Insects%20BIML%20Lab2.pdf

Google Hangout Demonstration of Techniques:
plus.google.com/events/c5569losvskrv2nu606ltof8odo
or
www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c15neFttoU

Excellent Technical Form on Stacking:
www.photomacrography.net/

Contact information:
Sam Droege
sdroege@usgs.gov



301 497 5840

Saudade

Bregalis posted a photo:

Saudade

suns nor moons nor stars
can encompass what is lost
only saudade

“Saudade is a key emotion word for Portuguese speakers. Though akin to nostalgia or longing, the term has no direct equivalent in English. As the Brazilian musician Gilberto Gil sings in ‘Toda saudade’, it is the presence of absence...”
Michael Amoruso
‘Saudade: the untranslatable word for the presence of absence’
Aeon, October 8, 2018

Highlife

Scott Holcomb posted a photo:

Highlife

Life in the Subalpine/Montane zone has a brief “awake” period during the high-altitude summer months. As winter approaches, the aspen and evergreen conifers prepare for their long winter sleep.

This photo was taken by an Asahi Pentax 6 X 7 medium format film camera with a Super-Multi-Coated Takumar/6X7 1:4.5/75mm lens and Pentax 67 82ø Y48(Y2) SMC filter using Adox CHS 100 II film, the negative scanned by an Epson Perfection V600 and digitally rendered with Photoshop.

How Mighty Are The Fallen

Scott Holcomb posted a photo:

How Mighty Are The Fallen

After nearly 40 centuries overlooking the Bristlecone Pine Mountain Realm, this revered ancient has fallen, surrounded by family members. A monument to time itself, the wooden remains record annals of the past.

This photo was taken by a Kowa/SIX medium format film camera and KOWA 1:3.5/55mm lens with a Zenza Bronica 67mm SO56•2C(YA3) filter using Ilford Delta 400 Pro film, the negative scanned by an Epson Perfection V600 and digitalized using Photoshop.

Top to Bottom

Scott Holcomb posted a photo:

Top to Bottom

Bald Mountain in the Great Basin National Park is a perfect illustration of altitude-determined ecological plant zones.
Beginning with the top, the stratified plant ecology goes as follows:
1. Alpine Vegetation – Alpine;
2. Spruce-Fir (dominated by Engelmann spruce, and white fir) – Subalpine;
3. Subalpine Pine (dominated by limber pine and bristlecone pine) – Subalpine;
4. Aspen – Subalpine & Montane;
5. Mixed Conifer (dominated by white-fir, Douglas-fir and limber pine) – Montane;
6. Ponderosa Pine – Montane;
7. Mountain Sagebrush – Montane;
8. Mountain Mahogany Woodlands – Montane & Foothills;
9. Pinyon-Juniper Woodlands – Foothills;
10. Sagebrush/Grasslands – Basin.

This photo was taken by a Kowa/SIX medium format film camera with a KOWA LENS-S 1:3.5/150mm lens and Kowa L-1A ø67 filter using Kodak Portra 160 film, the negative scanned by an Epson Perfection V600 and digitally rendered with Photoshop.

Camping at Lehman Creek, NV - 1976

tonopah06 posted a photo:

Camping at Lehman Creek, NV - 1976

At our campsite along Lehman Creek near Lehman Caves National Monument, now Great Basin National Park. Cropped. Scanned from a Kodachrome slide.


F Loretta 1976 9 @ Lehman Caves 1976

International Cafe and Bar

Duncan Rawlinson - Duncan.co posted a photo:

International Cafe and Bar

Duncan.co/international-cafe-and-bar

Helping the Elderly

Scott Holcomb posted a photo:

Helping the Elderly

A helping hand to one’s elders is a duty that expresses kindness and love.

This photo was taken by a Kowa/SIX medium format film camera and KOWA 1:3.5/55mm lens with a Zenza Bronica 67mm SY48•2C(Y2) filter using Ilford Delta 100 Pro film, the negative scanned by an Epson Perfection V600 and digitalized using Photoshop.