Great Basin National Park, Nevada

Great Basin National Park is in the state of Nevada and lies near the cities of Ely, Border, and Baker in White Pine county. It's received it's name for the being the basin between the Wasatch and Sierra Nevada Mountain ranges. The park was established in 1986 on October 27 and stretches just over 120 square miles attracting over 90,000 visitors annually. There are over 800 types of plants in the park. The oldest living tree ever discover once stood in the park but was cut down in 1964 for research. A wide variety of wildlife exists in the park including multiple types of Rabbits, squirrels, and mice and larger mammals such as Mountain Lions, sheep, bobcats, and deer. Several species of trout are in the parks waters with the Bonneville cutthroat being the only native. Hawks, eagles, and swallows are just some of the types of birds found in the park. The features of the park were largely formed by volcanic and glacial activity. An extensive cave system made up of limestone and marble called Lehman caves can be found in the park. The caves were initially a national park of there own and were absorbed into the Great Basin National Park at it's establishment in 1986.

Great Basin National Park Info


Great Basin National Park

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News

Snake Creek to be Closed for Treatment

Great Basin National Park will be conducting a stream treatment. To ensure the safety of Park visitors, Snake Creek Canyon will be closed from 9:00 am Monday July 23rd until 3:00 pm on Friday July 28th.

GBNP Featured in New York Times

Great Basin National Park was featured in a travel article in the New York Times. The article was penned by Rachel Levin.

New Superintendent James Woolsey

The National Park Service has selected James Woolsey to serve as the next superintendent of Great Basin National Park in Nevada. He replaces Steve Mietz, who was promoted to superintendent of Redwood National & State Parks in California.

Great Basin National Park Photos

Yugen

Bregalis posted a photo:

Yugen

snowfall on smooth stone
still soul of ballerina
grace risen from rock
sensuous beyond speaking

Japanese Noh plays, based on ancient mythologies and performed since the fourteenth century, are short, highly stylized performances depicting the interactions of mortals and spirits. The plays are presented in a minimalist setting, sometimes having only a painted screen as backdrop - the painting often depicting an ancient ‘spirit tree’ (Kodama) reminiscent of a bristlecone (world’s oldest play thus meets world’s oldest tree).

Music, dance, and song (or chant) are incorporated in Noh - all speaking and singing parts in the five-seven style of most Japanese poetry. In this sense, Noh presents to the audience an experience of dance, poetry and music as interchangeable (and convergent) points on a continuum of art and perception. Among the qualities necessary to fully understand Noh is ‘Yugen’, which refers to a felt, but undefined, beauty - specifically, a subconscious immersion in the profoundly sublime beauty of the transcendental.

Many Western writers, playwrights and poets have been influenced and fascinated by Noh, including the English poet W.B. Yeats who, in 1916, wrote a one-act play (‘At the Hawk’s Well’) based on the Noh play ‘Hagoromo’ (The Feather Mantle). Of the five types of Noh, ‘Hagoromo’ is a ‘woman play’ - a play in which the primary character (shite), whether spirit or mortal, is female. Such plays are characterized by refined song and dance - the dance languid and dreamlike.

In ‘Hagoromo’ a fisherman discovers a moon spirit’s feather veil hanging from a branch and takes it for himself. The spirit, discovering this and unable to return to the spirit world without it, asks the fisherman for its return. The fisherman agrees, but only if the spirit will show him her dance which depicts the changing phases of the moon. After showing her dance and receiving her veil, the spirit fades from sight as though a mountain into a mist.

More recently in New York (2017), an Ezra Pound translation of ‘Hagoromo’ and another Noh play were incorporated into the opera/dance ‘Only the Sound Remains’. In a review of this work, the New York Times wrote that, “...the plays explore spirituality as a kind of longing, almost a love affair, between mortal and spirit beings.”

Such is ‘Yugen’. Inger Christensen once put it this way, “...beneath what is changing and inexpressible, there is an order and a beauty that can burst forth at any time.” Really now, who has never felt a subtle longing for the transcendental grace of the ballerina...or the ancient alchemy of the moon?

Noh video:
www.theatlantic.com/video/index/577531/noh-japanese/

Perturbation

Bregalis posted a photo:

Perturbation

galactic near miss
order ripples like water
many stars perturbed

Perturbation:
earthsky.org/space/milky-way-near-miss-sagittarius-galaxy...

Brave New World

Bregalis posted a photo:

Brave New World

Melissa Blue (Lycaeides melissa)

Ron Wolf posted a photo:

Melissa Blue (Lycaeides melissa)

Melissa Blue (Lycaeides melissa). Great Basin National Park. Near Baker, White Pine Co., Nevada/

Mt. Wheeler and Jeff Davis Peak

Ron Wolf posted a photo:

Mt. Wheeler and Jeff Davis Peak

Mt. Wheeler (elev. 13,063 ft.) is the second-highest peak in Nevada. Jeff Davis Peak (12,771 ft.) is at the left end of this glaciated ridge. View from Stella Lake. Great Basin National Park. Near Baker, White Pine Co., Nevada.

Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)

Ron Wolf posted a photo:

Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)

Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis). Great Basin National Park. Near Baker, White Pine Co., Nevada.

Arc

Bregalis posted a photo:

Arc

imagine
a timeless falling
resolute and fearless
an inverse levitation
an imperceptible
leaning into the abyss
a creeping like stone
through a continuum
of geologic time
an open embrace
of earth and air
and infinite possibility
each aching increment
of its millennial arc
an unseen flight subtle
beyond all knowing
until at softest touch
of muffled snowflake
in dark and in silence
a release so
discordantly sudden
wisps of dreamtime
and stardust
waft over the void
for time beyond
the spark of our
little lives

Wheeler Peak

alex1derr posted a photo:

Wheeler Peak

bristlecone pine trees

alex1derr posted a photo:

bristlecone pine trees

bristlecone pine trees

alex1derr posted a photo:

bristlecone pine trees

'You're Fired!!!'

Bregalis posted a photo:

'You're Fired!!!'

Bristlecone anticipates SNL cold open by maybe 3000 years...

Little-big Ditties

Ramen Saha posted a photo:

Little-big Ditties

Great Basin is one of the remotest US national parks, which preserves an alpine oasis in the middle of the Nevada desert. Very few people visit it; at about 145,000 annual visitations, it is one of the least visited national parks in the contiguous US. The park is located next to a tiny town – Baker, NV. Between the park and the town, it is hard to reckon who sustains whom. Despite their limited magnitude, both have some character to flaunt. The park hosts the only thirteener in Nevada – the Wheeler Peak (above) – and an army of bristlecone pine trees – the oldest non-clonal (sexually reproducing) living being on this planet. The town has a few businesses, one of them being the ghostly lone gas station that takes forever to run the card and then pumps gas with the distinct squeak of old age. You could say, between the melancholic park and the quiet town, nature has been left at its unadulterated best.

Today, in the park, a young park ranger is leading her second to last tour of the excellent Lehman Caves before her temporary term with the national park services ends for the season. Using her infectious sense of humor and impeccable knowledge about the local cave system, she is enlightening visitors about the underworld created by dripping water for eons. You can’t tell, but she is hiding her worries about finding the next job quite well behind her warm smile. You could say, the park and its ranger share the same spirit – despite hints of melancholia, it is unmistakably vibrant.

Nearby, in the little town, a young couple have ended up owning and running the only year-long operating inn. They also run a restaurant in summer; but in low traffic months, they understandably prefer sleep over money. Mild mannered and always willing to put their warmest hand forward to care for their guests, these innkeepers have sustained their enterprise well. They are not photographers, but proudly display a book about Ansel Adams in their office. If you promise not to ruin the book, you may borrow it for the evening. You could say, these kind innkeepers, as their little town, uphold important values in their magnanimous hearts.

In between the park and the little town, there is a point in space, where time flows gently as clouds. If you end up here, you may hear faintly audible tribal-songs of the gale that impulsively narrates farrago stories of nearby rangers and innkeepers. You could say, between the lonesome park, the little-big town with the squeaky gas station, and those wind songs, one finds more than what the soul can hope for and the broken mind can hide.

White checkerbloom (Sidalcea candida), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

BaileyImgs posted a photo:

White checkerbloom (Sidalcea candida), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

More information regarding this species is available via en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidalcea_candida.

Scouler's st john's wort (Hypericum scouleri), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

BaileyImgs posted a photo:

Scouler's st john's wort (Hypericum scouleri), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

More information regarding this species is available via www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-calrecnu....

Columbian monkshood (Aconitum columbianum), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

BaileyImgs posted a photo:

Columbian monkshood (Aconitum columbianum), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

More information regarding this species is available via www.americansouthwest.net/plants/wildflowers/aconitum-col....

White bog orchid (Platanthera dilatata), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

BaileyImgs posted a photo:

White bog orchid (Platanthera dilatata), Great Basin National Park, White Pine County, Nevada

More information regarding this species is available via www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/platanthera_d....

P1020751

cymantha3062 posted a photo:

P1020751

Wheeler Peak, Great Basin National Park

P1020745

cymantha3062 posted a photo:

P1020745

Wheeler Peak, Great Basin National Park

P1020734

cymantha3062 posted a photo:

P1020734

Great Basin National Park

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sraffo posted a photo:

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