Great Basin National Park, Nevada

Great Basin National Park is in the state of Nevada and lies near the cities of Ely, Border, and Baker in White Pine county. It's received it's name for the being the basin between the Wasatch and Sierra Nevada Mountain ranges. The park was established in 1986 on October 27 and stretches just over 120 square miles attracting over 90,000 visitors annually. There are over 800 types of plants in the park. The oldest living tree ever discover once stood in the park but was cut down in 1964 for research. A wide variety of wildlife exists in the park including multiple types of Rabbits, squirrels, and mice and larger mammals such as Mountain Lions, sheep, bobcats, and deer. Several species of trout are in the parks waters with the Bonneville cutthroat being the only native. Hawks, eagles, and swallows are just some of the types of birds found in the park. The features of the park were largely formed by volcanic and glacial activity. An extensive cave system made up of limestone and marble called Lehman caves can be found in the park. The caves were initially a national park of there own and were absorbed into the Great Basin National Park at it's establishment in 1986.

Great Basin National Park Info


Great Basin National Park

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News

Snake Creek to be Closed for Treatment

Great Basin National Park will be conducting a stream treatment. To ensure the safety of Park visitors, Snake Creek Canyon will be closed from 9:00 am Monday July 23rd until 3:00 pm on Friday July 28th.

GBNP Featured in New York Times

Great Basin National Park was featured in a travel article in the New York Times. The article was penned by Rachel Levin.

New Superintendent James Woolsey

The National Park Service has selected James Woolsey to serve as the next superintendent of Great Basin National Park in Nevada. He replaces Steve Mietz, who was promoted to superintendent of Redwood National & State Parks in California.

Great Basin National Park Photos

Waiting

Bregalis posted a photo:

Waiting

“What are we doing here, that is the question. And we are blessed in this, that we happen to know the answer. Yes, in the immense confusion one thing alone is clear. We are waiting for Godot...”
― Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot (1953)

Polaris

Bregalis posted a photo:

Polaris

tree of polaris
fickle axis of north sky
now but emptiness
beyond your wizened gesture
the sun is risen
the firmament is shifted
the cosmos yet hums
your graceful reign is ending
soon another star
perchance yet another tree


Precession of the Earth: www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlVgEoZDjok

Great Basin Wood-nymph (Cercyonis sthenele)

Ron Wolf posted a photo:

Great Basin Wood-nymph (Cercyonis sthenele)

Great Basin Wood-nymph (Cercyonis sthenele). Great Basin National Park. Near Baker, White Pine Co., Nevada.

mattuwu posted a photo:

Great Basin National Park

mattuwu posted a photo:

Great Basin National Park

mattuwu posted a photo:

Great Basin National Park

mattuwu posted a photo:

Great Basin National Park

mattuwu posted a photo:

Great Basin National Park

Squiggle

Bregalis posted a photo:

Squiggle

A squiggle is mirth set into fluid motion when two teams of fairies play dodgeball by flinging molecules. Sometimes, under circumstances not yet completely understood by even the most learned of alchemists, the squiggle loses fluidity and abruptly solidifies - much as water can phase through liquid, gaseous, or solid states. Some speculate that, as sometimes seen in the realms of the common Tree Fairy (Fairius arboreteae), this solidification significantly correlates most frequently with sudden losses by the ‘Home’ team - the efficacious result (from the standpoint of the empirical observer) often being wonderfully patterned wood such as that exhibited here.

Since the corporeal existence of fairies and molecules cannot be definitively confirmed by our everyday experiential perceptual senses, we know of both only by the observation of concomitant phenomena such as the squiggle. Or because someone told us so.

As suggested by the amplitude of the squiggles in its atmosphere, the fairies and molecules of Jupiter surely must dwarf all others in our solar system - and perhaps some beyond as well.

Rocky Cliffs

annestravels2 posted a photo:

Rocky Cliffs

The canyon that houses the Glacier, as seen from the Bristlecone Pine Forest, Great Basin National Park, NV. For trail information, visit www.annestravels.net/bristlecone-pine-forest/

Bristlecone Pine

annestravels2 posted a photo:

Bristlecone Pine

A sightly bristlecone pine tree in the Bristlecone Pine Forest, Great Basin National Park. For trail information, visit www.annestravels.net/bristlecone-pine-forest/

Fall Foliage

annestravels2 posted a photo:

Fall Foliage

The road up to Wheeler Peak Campground, Great Basin National Park, NV. For trail information, visit www.annestravels.net/bristlecone-pine-forest/

The Glacier's Cirque

annestravels2 posted a photo:

The Glacier's Cirque

The Glacier, Great Basin National Park, NV. The rock glacier is in the foreground. For trail information, visit www.annestravels.net/bristlecone-pine-forest/

Nevada's Only Glacier

annestravels2 posted a photo:

Nevada's Only Glacier

Up close to The Glacier, Great Basin National Park, NV. For trail information, visit www.annestravels.net/bristlecone-pine-forest/

Theresa Lake

annestravels2 posted a photo:

Theresa Lake

Theresa Lake, Great Basin National Park, NV. For trail information, visit www.annestravels.net/bristlecone-pine-forest/

Ballet of Hands

Ramen Saha posted a photo:

Ballet of Hands

Ansel Adams was a perfectionist and very picky about reproducing his photographs. He always reproduced them himself when he was alive and for the thereafter, he established a trust to oversee correct reproduction of his photos. Why? Remember, reproducing a photograph in his days was arduous. Using the source film (negative) to print on the photographic paper, one had to use pre-tested set of chemicals at determined concentrations followed by dodging and burning again and again in the ethereal redness of the darkroom. No wonder, upon receiving print requests from customers for a certain few of his elaborate photos (e.g., the Tetons and the Snake river), Ansel would groan and look visibly upset despite the commercial prospect. This is because those elaborate photos required extensive dodging and burning, which needed what Ansel called well-choreographed and rehearsed ‘ballet of hands’ that lasted for a better portion of an hour. Wonder, how elated Ansel would have been with Photoshop, where the ‘ballet of hands’ has to be done only once and reproduction of photos from thereon can be an automated process. Or, would he have despised the digital workflow that would have stripped him of half his virtues as a photographer, especially his exclusive abilities to reign over the quality of his reproductions in the darkroom? One wonders.

Cut to our modern day inside a dark cave, which has many tales that beg for an audience. The most poignant of these is the story that is 500 million years in making. Over this ‘little’ period of time, water has sculpted a cave-full of folia, drapes, stalagmites, stalactites, columns, anthodites, and shields that form a grand speleothemic visual opera – a ballet of water, limestone, and time, if you will. Photographing this opera – where NPS kindly provides the light via abruptly placed high wattage bulbs (wish they knew about low level lighting) and don’t allow tripods without executive permissions (that I didn’t have) – is groan-inducing. However, with a bit of creativity, I obtained RAW images of several cave scenes, all of which had humongous dynamic range. After 3-4 hours of hands ballet in Photoshop, I was able to put together what you see above. Ansel would have waved his hand dismissively at the quality of this image, but he may have smiled seeing me groan while experiencing the royal pain from his kind of ballet.

New Moon Perseid Meteor

mattuwu posted a photo:

New Moon Perseid Meteor

Catching some perseids a few days before the peak of the meteor shower during August New Moon. Cool to think that the ground is illuminated only by star light.

Single 15 second exposure from a Nikon D850 at ISO3200 using a 25mm Milvus f1.4 lens at f1.8.

Red Trees and Perseid Meteor

mattuwu posted a photo:

Red Trees and Perseid Meteor

Red illuminated trees from a LED lantern and a Perseid meteor in the center of the image. Shot from Great Basin National Park.

Single 30 second exposure.

Lehman Caves

fractalv posted a photo:

Lehman Caves

Great Basin National Park, Nevada

Lehman Caves

fractalv posted a photo:

Lehman Caves

Great Basin National Park, Nevada