Haleakala National Park, Hawaii

Haleakala National Park is situated on the island of Maui, Hawaii and contains an inactive volcano. It was established as a national park in 1961 on July 1 and covers an area of around 52 square miles. Around 1.1 million visitors frequent the park each year. The park is divided into to parts, the summit and kipahulu. The summit contains the volcano's summit and Haleakala Crater. A road for vistors to access the park runs directly into this section. Seeing the sunrise from this section is a popular activity for visitors. Kipahulu and the summit are separated by an area that is off limit to the general public to protect the rainforest. Hiking and swimming are popular activities in the Kipahulu section. The park contains more endangered species than any other national parks. All of the wildlife on the island arrived here through early settlers or by migration due to the parks volcanic history.

Haleakala National Park Info


Haleakala National Park

Warning: strtotime(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /var/www/vhosts/explorenationalparks.org/httpdocs/lib/model/parks.php on line 190

Hōlua Backcountry Camping to Temporarily Close on June 20

Kula, Maui— On June 20, 2019, the Hōlua backcountry camping area of Haleakalā National Park will temporarily close overnight to control non-native Argentine ants.

Water System Upgrade in the Kīpahulu District of Haleakalā National Park

KÄ«pahulu, Maui— On June 18, 2019, the National Park Service will begin to replace approximately 4,800 feet of waterline pipe in the KÄ«pahulu District of Haleakalā National Park. 

Fatality in the Kīpahulu District of Haleakalā National Park

KÄ«pahulu, Maui — Late in the evening of May 30, 2019, Maui Fire Department, Maui Police Department, and the National Park Service responded to a report of an injured person in the Pools of ‘OheÊ»o in the KÄ«pahulu District of Haleakalā National Park.

Kalahaku Overlook Improvement Environmental Assessment Comment Period Opens

Haleakalā National Park invites the public to review and comment on the Environmental Assessment for Kalahaku Overlook Area Management. The park is proposing to rehabilitate Kalahaku Overlook to improve visitor safety, enjoyment, and to protect natural and cultural resources.

Haleakala National Park Photos

Colors of Haleakala

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Colors of Haleakala

Different vantage point

Haleakala

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Haleakala

Same vantage point from the visitor center as sunrise, yet a very different view once it's cleared up

Three Hills

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Three Hills

On the sliding sands trail as we approach the cinder cones

The Bamboo Forest

waynengphotography posted a photo:

The Bamboo Forest

Pipiwai bamboo is really tall...

Golden Maui

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Golden Maui

Sunrise at Haleakala

Smoking Cinders

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Smoking Cinders

Cloud covered cinder cone in Haleakala

The Banyan Tree

waynengphotography posted a photo:

The Banyan Tree

On the Pipiwai trail, about a halfway up, you run into the undisputed king of the jungle. There's one of these in Lahaina too, but this one in the middle of nowhere seems super impressive. Not sure how these things grow, but they're pretty cool.

Waimoku Falls ll

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Waimoku Falls ll

vertical shot of waimoku

Waimoku Falls

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Waimoku Falls

At the end of the Pipiwai Trail, you face a towering waterfall known as Waimoku Falls. It was a bit thinner than I imagined, maybe based on the time of year that it was. But it certainly is a sight to see after trudging through the jungle to see it.

The Pipiwai Trail

mikeperryphotography posted a photo:

The Pipiwai Trail

Website | Facebook | Instagram

The Pipiwai Trail is a must stop along the Road to Hana. Walking through the bamboo forest, found on the second half of the trail, almost feels spiritual. It was fairly busy on the trail, but even so, I could wait a minute or two for people to pass and the trail to empty. Then I would experience a cathedral-like silence to revel in the moment before eventually starting back up the trail to Waimoku Falls.

Haleakala National Park, HI

Pools of 'Ohe'o

waynengphotography posted a photo:

Pools of 'Ohe'o

Also known as the Seven Sacred Pools, first glance doesn't seem that special: the water level that day was kinda low, so low that the park had closed off swimming in them. And brown water, very brown water.

But as I was hiking up the path, I saw the very first in the sequence of waterfalls under the bridge and couldn't help but marvel at the serenity of the scene. Indeed, it would be quite the treat to see all 7 going at the same time with this level of water and flow.

Haleakala Crater

Elyssa Drivas posted a photo:

Haleakala Crater

Pano of the Haleakala Crater located at the Haleakala National Park in Hawaii

Ocean through the Jungle

Kirt Edblom posted a photo:

Ocean through the Jungle

Looking through the jungle at the Pacific Ocean near Kūloa Point on the far SE side of Maui.

2019-05-25 - Pipiwai

waynengphotography posted a photo:

2019-05-25 - Pipiwai

Haleakala is known mostly for the sunrise in the Summit District but in the Kipahulu district as the end stop of the Road to Hana lies arguably the best hike on the Island. It's not terribly difficult (4 mile round trip) and at first doesn't feel that impressive...that is until you get to the halfway mark and you walk into a massive forest of bamboo.

All along a walkway are 60 ft bamboo stalks that have grown wild and create corridors of vegetation as far as the eye can see and high to the point where it obscures most of the sky because of the angle in which they grow. It's something truly breathtaking.

The Cinder Cone

waynengphotography posted a photo:

The Cinder Cone

This is the view from the Kalahaku viewpoint, where you can see these interesting cone shaped formations in the distance. Later in the day we down the Sliding Sands Trail, arguably for many people the hardest trail of their lives given the elevation gain.

Also, I can see why some movies can be filmed here as the cinder cones have the alien planet vibe in the caldera.

2019-05-23 - Haleakala Sunrise

waynengphotography posted a photo:

2019-05-23 - Haleakala Sunrise

Haleakala means house of sun in Hawaiian and its popularity assures you that unless you get there an hour before sunrise, you won't get a prime photography spot thanks to all the tour groups.

Hawaiian weather is a strange beast and honestly trying to predict/trust it is rolling dice. The weather said 40% chance of heavy rain in the morning for the next three days at the Summit on multiple sites, so our family decided to just give it a go this morning since our odds weren't looking better anyways. We left Kihei at 3 AM and by the time I got to Haleakala, I managed to literally snag the last spot along the railing at the Visitor Center.

Needless to say, the weather more than fully cooperated with us, giving us blankets of clouds that the sun peeked out of at its scheduled time.

Bamboo Along the Pipiwai Trail

`James Wheeler posted a photo:

Bamboo Along the Pipiwai Trail

The waterfall at the end of this hike was amazing, but I enjoyed the walk through the bamboo forest to get there even more. We have lots of waterfalls in Canada but not so many bamboo forests.

Posted with Photerloo

Alehe-ka-la

Ramen Saha posted a photo:

Alehe-ka-la

Prologue: Maui, 1400 AD. For the past few weeks, the tiny fishing village of Lao is in distress. The mighty Alehe-ka-la is likely waking up again; Villagers so suspect from the frequent earth shaking and the dim plume of ash rising from the shield volcano peak. If Alehe-ka-la indeed erupts, villagers will have to evacuate. But there are not enough canoes for everyone to ship out to safety. To build additional canoes, the village Ali'i (chief) has decided to dispatch a band of elite kahunas – canoe carvers – to the rainforest to acquire Koa trees. Another group of men, women and children have been assigned another important job… they must hike up to Alehe-ka-la’s crater, perform ceremonies and offer pule (prayers) to appease and calm down the volcano goddess.

Lilinoi’s journey: After consulting stars, weather, and nature signs, both parties depart for their respective destinations. They travel together up Alehe-ka-la’s slopes to the rain forests, where canoe carvers will spend days to find the right trees by listening to birds – a tree that harbors many birds will have many worms and will not be suitable for canoe making. The ceremony party – priests, drummers, singers, sinners and young children – hikes past the rainforest towards the peak above the clouds. One of these young children is Lilinoi, a ten year old, who was named after the goddess of Aleha-ka-la herself. Lilinoi has never been to the peak, but her parents have told her stories of many Pu'u ka uaua-s – stubborn mountains that look nothing like the rocks of her village shores. Ascending the steep slopes on her young legs, Lilinoi imagines that her songs will melt the heart of these Pu'u ka uaua-s.

After hiking for days, the party climbs past the clouds and reach the peak. On the way, they see many o'o (yellow) and i'iwi (red) birds. That is a good sign; birds can sense the volcano’s anger better and know when to flee. Upon reaching the rim of the summit, the ceremony party quickly gets down to their job. They chant, drum, sing and offer poi (taro root paste) and lau lau (fish, salt & pork fat wrapped in taro leaves and steam cooked) to the goddess. Rupturing the extraordinary silence of the rim, their soulful pleas for mercy resonate through miles for every god in the crater to hear.

Clearly astonished by the stunning landscape in front of her, Lilinoi turns to her mother and asks, “Makuahine, where does Lilinoi live?" She knew that her namesake goddess lives in a Pu'u (cinder cone), and was confident she will know it when see sees it. But betraying her imagination, there are several Pu'u-s in the crater in front of her. In response, mother points to the multicolored Pu'u in front of her, "That’s her heiau" (temple). Lilinoi stares at the Pu'u that is mildly smoking out earth’s ashes, and pleads the goddess with all her heart to spare her family and her village.

Epilogue: For ages, mountains have resembled realms of higher authorities. Haleakala – a derivative of the native Alehe-ka-la (snarer of the sun) – is no exception. Revered by native Hawai’ians, this sleeping volcano is an integral part of human heritage on the island. As for our somewhat-imaginary story, Lilinoi, the goddess, responded to little Lilinoi's pule, songs and pleas and calmed down for ages.

Legends of Maui and La (Explored)

Ramen Saha posted a photo:

Legends of Maui and La (Explored)

Sea level. 2:30PM. Kahului, Maui. “So much cloud!”, I thought as we get in the car to visit Haleakalā National Park. The Haleakalā peak is shrouded behind a thick cloud bank. I fear, our trip will be in vain to a gloomy peak.

3000 feet. 3:00PM. We travel through a rich canopy of vegetation where Hawaiʻian spring is in full tropical bloom. Flowers of all colors are on display. The peak is still shrouded in clouds.

7000 feet. 4:00PM. Park Headquarters Visitor Center. The switchbacks are dizzying. So, we get out of the car to acclimatize with the rapid gain in elevation. As is my custom, I chat up the ranger at the visitor center front desk. The ranger tells me to expect clear conditions at the peak because the cloud bank remains suspended around 8000 feet. She says, “Stay for the sunset. It will be good.

8500 feet. 4:30PM. Roadside brief stop. The vista here gets very moody as clouds swirl past us. It feels much colder as well (usually, 3ºF for every 1000 feet of elevation change). Rishabh rolls down the window to catch some cloud. As he tries, our car fills up with wet fog. Wish, I could get out of the car to shoot the Hitchcock-ian atmosphere, but the narrow road forbids.

10,023 feet. 5:30PM. Puʻuʻulaʻula summit. Brilliant sunshine all around! I see tens of people in shorts and flipflops cringing in the cold. Rishabh and I pull our jackets on. The view of the famed massive shield volcano with unreal Mars like surface is impressive. At $5 per shot, I make some cryptic dollars shooting photos for families on their phones and tablets. Park advisories remind us that the air is very thin at this elevation and we should avoid exertion. I am breathing deeper and faster. Thin air or adrenaline from the grand view? Don’t know.

9324 feet. 6:45PM. Kalahaku overlook. The sunrise at Haleakalā is one of the top draws for Maui visitors. Because of the high demand, NPS offers limited tickets for vehicles to enter the park between 3-7 AM. I tried obtaining one online on three consecutive days, but those 80 odd tickets per day disappear in about 20 seconds of the sales opening at the .gov site. No sunrise for us! But, the ranger's assurance rings in my ears: “Stay for the sunset. It will be good.” So we stay back with about a dozen more people scattered thinly over the parking lot. Slowly, the tired sun-god – La – dips into the same bank of wet fog at 8500 feet, which Rishabh had caught a bit of earlier. May be it’s just the elevation or it is lack of oxygen in my brain… everything around us feels insanely peaceful! Right in front of us, as legends promise, Maui – the mischievous demigod of Polynesian folklore – lassoes La for the day and takes him behind curtains.

Sign for Women's Restroom in Haleakala National Park in Maui, Hawaii

alaneshoemaker posted a photo:

Sign for Women's Restroom in Haleakala National Park in Maui, Hawaii

Sign for Women's Restroom in Haleakala National Park in Maui, Hawaii