Sequoia National Park, California

This landscape testifies to nature's size, beauty, and diversity huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world's largest trees. Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks lie side by side in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of the San Joaquin Valley. Visitor activities vary by season and elevation 1,370 to 14,494 feet .

Sequoia National Park Info


Sequoia National Park

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Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Release 2019 Fire Year Summary and 2020 Prescribed Burn and Mechanical Treatment Plans

SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. January 25, 20202 – Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks are releasing their 2019 fire year summary and 2020 prescribed burn and mechanical treatment plans to the public. Mechanical fuels treatments, prescribed burns, lightning-caused wildfires managed for multiple objectives, one being full suppression, all play a role in protecting these highly valued resources and assets. The use of a variety of wildland fire management tools makes wildfire management efforts much more safe and cost effective.

Firefighters Respond to Structure Fire in Kings Canyon National Park

KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Calif. January 11, 2020 – Yesterday morning, January 10, 2020, structural firefighters responded to a fully engulfed non-residential multi-use building in the Grant Grove Village inside Kings Canyon National Park. The fire is extinguished and the cause is under investigation.

What to Know Before Visiting Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Thanksgiving Weekend 2019

SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. November 25, 2019 – A winter storm projected for this week means trip planning prior to visiting will be critical for a safe and enjoyable visit to Sequoia and Kings Canyon. The road between the parks is expected to close Tuesday, November 26 at 4 p.m. in preparation for the storm which could bring up to four feet of snow in the Giant Forest and Grant Grove areas. Tire chain restrictions will be in place, with longer waiting periods expected at entrance stations, and possible road closures due to snow accumulation. Visitors are encouraged to call 559-565-3341 (dial 1, then 1) for current road and weather conditions prior to driving up to the parks.

A Deceased Individual Located in the Area of Mt. Darwin in Kings Canyon National Park

SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, California (November 7, 2019)–While conducting a ground search in the area along the route of Mt. Darwin, searchers located a deceased individual that matched the description of missing hiker Alan Stringer (40).

Sequoia National Park Photos

"Bye, Mom!" from Tokopah Falls

rovingmagpie posted a photo:

"Bye, Mom!" from Tokopah Falls

There was a sign warning against going any further. Some of the usual BS about slipping, falling and dying, etc.
They just put those there to scare you.

Tule Bluet 3346

Ethan.Winning posted a photo:

Tule Bluet 3346

I just happened to run across this nine year old image while looking for something else. I thought that ALL of my dragons and damsels were taken in Walnut Creek, near Mt. Diablo. But I was asked about some images of Sequoia NP and in going into the archives, lo and behold, a Tule Bluet at close to 8,000 feet, the summit of Little Baldy in Sequoia in 2011.

This is not "landscaping bark," but rather the natural accumulation of bark from sequoias, redwood, and whatever other giants the park has, and that makes the find all the more remarkable.

I usually remember the circumstances surrounding shots, but not always exactly where. But this time, I didn't remember until I laid eyes on it again. It is very unusual to find a damselfly at altitude, and I'd never seen one before (or since) in Sequoia, Had I been as involved with odonates in 2011 as I was this past summer, I would have spent the next two visits looking for damsels. Too bad, but it's "only 3.5 hours"...

When my Bentley is delivered, I might try a spin down south... Don't hold your collective breaths.

Cathedral

rovingmagpie posted a photo:

Cathedral

We delayed leaving for as long as we could. This was just "one last hike" in Sequoia before we started the trip home for real. After we left here we dropped down into the central valley (now we know where all our grapes come from) and headed for Bakersfield. That would be a very different experience from this, and would not inspire as many photos. OK, it would not inspire any photos.

There are still a few to come from the tour, though... we didn't rush home.

Simplicity is nature's first step, and the last of art… no copy

ferpectshotz posted a photo:

Simplicity is nature's first step, and the last of art… no copy

- Philip James Bailey.

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I have written a lot about how the uncertainty of conditions at a location can be frustrating as a traveling landscape photographer. You can plan all you want, but until you are on prim at the location, you don’t know how a shot will pan out. In recent years, I have used this uncertainty to better adapt to conditions and in the long run, turn this frustration point to strength.

Today I want to talk about another rarer event, which is common in a traveling photographer’s life. It's when you have your entire trip planned, and suddenly, you are at a stunningly gorgeous location that blows you away. Suddenly all plans go out the window and you try to wait for favorable light to capture your newfound spot in all its glory. Dinners get delayed, check-in times get dangerously past midnight and you are dealing with a very irate wife who is hungry and tired. While this practice worked initially, as we got older my wife’s patience got a lot shorter and it took us a whole lot of time to recover from the change in plans. We knew that it was not sustainable and had to come up with a better solution.

Eventually, after some trial and error, we have an approach that works, and it's as follows. Whenever we happened upon an amazing new spot, we explore the new location and make detailed notes so we can later incorporate it into a future trip. The details then go into my google maps account with all the relevant metadata.

Today's shot is from one such location. We were visiting Sequoia National Park and were supposed to meet up with some friends there. Parking was hard inside the NP, so we decided on a nearby campground as the meeting place. As we drove up to the area, we realized how pretty it was; there were a nice pond and some truly massive sequoias around the shore. Unfortunately, the light was harsh and the original composition I had in mind did not work due to bad lighting. So, I walked across the pond and came across this viewpoint which manageable light. I made a pano shot from a nearby sequoia trunk. I can't wait to come back and have a go with better light conditions.

Wonder

rovingmagpie posted a photo:

Wonder

From this, came those.


(last photo from Day 24)

Tunnel Log, branches end

rovingmagpie posted a photo:

Tunnel Log, branches end

This was so cool, if a bit claustrophobic. The trail ran right through the length of a burned-out Sequoia. It was so big we didn't need to crouch down, just walked straight through it.

See it from the other end here.

Muir Grove

j.flickinger posted a photo:

Muir Grove

Muir Grove in Sequoia National Park

Mineral King

j.flickinger posted a photo:

Mineral King

The gateway to Mineral King valley. Sawtooth Peak to the far right.

Christmas in Sequoia

vanalan posted a photo:

Christmas in Sequoia

the road well traveled... Sequoia National Park

al-ien posted a photo:

the road well traveled... Sequoia National Park

California

stay inside... Moro Rock Sequoia NP

al-ien posted a photo:

stay inside... Moro Rock  Sequoia NP

the sign might be a little over-kill...
Sequoia National Park
Moro Rock is a granite dome rock formation in Sequoia National Park, California, United States. Wikipedia
A stairway, designed by the National Park Service and built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps, is cut into and poured onto the rock, so that visitors can hike to the top. The view from the rock encompasses much of the Park, including the Great Western Divide.

Sequoia National Park... Moro Rock

al-ien posted a photo:

Sequoia National Park... Moro Rock

Moro Rock is a granite dome rock formation in Sequoia National Park, California, United States.

There are those who give with joy, and that joy is their reward...

ferpectshotz posted a photo:

There are those who give with joy, and that joy is their reward...

- Khalil Gibran.

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While we lived in LA, a quick getaway meant either Yosemite or Joshua Tree National Parks with Death Valley occasionally thrown in. Now while these parks are fantastic locations to visit, they require quite a bit of planning due to their popularity in recent years. So a quick getaway is not a possibility. Then we heard about Kings Canyon and Sequoia National parks. They were closer to us than the other parks except for Joshua tree. When I learned that the canyon is deeper than the Grand Canyon, I was hooked. We made an initial exploratory trip to the park and found it was mostly just us a couple of other families. The remoteness and rather sparse amenities once inside the park make it a challenging destination for most people.

On the benefits side, the views my god the views, it seems like this park has some stunning viewpoints overlooking some actual wild landscapes. Then comes the stunning Canyon and the brilliant Giant Sequoias.

One of the coolest geographical features is the Morro rock at the Sequoia national park that provides you with a high vantage point to view the entrance to the park. I made this trip in 2013 and discarded this panorama shot as unusable because, quite frankly, none of the software I had at the time could make a decent stitch of the image. But when I was going over my pictures and saw this series, I tried my luck again with photoshop cc and voila!

Checkerspot Fritillary Sequoia 3386

Ethan.Winning posted a photo:

Checkerspot Fritillary Sequoia 3386

This butterfly has been in my "queue" for almost nine years. I like it, but I'm not crazy about it. And yet, I remember taking it: Crescent Meadow, Sequoia National Park (south central Sierras, California). At the time, a brand new Canons SX20 camera and I wasn't sure of its capabilities, but I was comfortable with mine.

Crescent Meadow is probably 1,000 feet, but that altitude is reached by car unliked the 8,000 Little Baldy that we climbed four times to get to the Western Divide. Little Baldy is my favorite mountain "trail" in Sequoia while the meadow is my favorite ... meadow. Don't recognize it? Well, in all the books about national parks and western travel when I was a kid, I was fascinated by the fallen Sequoia into which that some park crew had cut a hole, and the encyclopedia that my parents had bought for me and my brother always showed a 1920s Ford Model something was driving through.

Now, I come from Massachusetts, sea level in fact. Books about the west were fascinating. I vividly remember geography books in elementary school showing pictures of highways cut through parts of the Rockies and others along the Colorado River. My folks believed in travel as an essential part of our education, and we went to many national parks, but our real "trip" was to Yellowstone from Cape Cod in 1947. From Minneapolis to Yellowstone was a dirt road. My brother and I "fought" from Niagara Falls to Fargo. Next was the Everglades. Then the TVA, and so on.

But we I got married, my young bride (I met her when she was 17!) and I decided to visit as many NPs from Banff to Death Valley. The only "spot" we seemed to have missed was Glacier, but that's because with two weeks vacation the norm, we kept going to Yosemite, Yellowstone, Rainier, Olympic, and the Pacific Coast from Alaska to San Diego.

I regret not seeing more of the Rockies, but I'll never regret going to Sequoia the five times, or Yosemite seven. Yosemite was three hours, and Sequoia was 5-6. (Today, there are some trips to all those places we visited in the 60s and 70s where you can triple the travel time.) It was the usual mindset: I'm here; now everybody else go away!

It's off that the remaining Sequoia physical image is a Checkerspot Fritillary Butterfly. Then again, I was never able to capture a sequoia tree. Still can't. But if you look through these Flickr pages, you'll find some of the wonders of this "small" NP. And on THIS particular trip I was determined to hike to the Falls, find wildflowers and the butterflies that mate at 7,600 feet (Acmon Blues). It wasn't until 2010 that I had a camera enabling me to get birds and capture panoramas and not have to be concerned with the cost of film and processing.

Well, I'll tell a little more on January 26. For now, I have to get my annual physical and discuss the marvels of having a flue shot and getting the flu which has hung on for seven weeks. Tapering off now, both me and the flu. I'll walk to my doctor's office in the rain and chill and be able to tell him that I'm exercising like crazy. If I had my druthers (do druthers exist outside the mind and are they always plural?) I'd be on Little Baldy. I still have some common sense that tells me a hike to 8044 feet might be my last. Then again, the way I feel, the half-mile to my doc's office might be my last. Don't say that!!! Too late.

Evolution Valley

Tim Lawnicki posted a photo:

Evolution Valley

A secluded montane kingdom, hazy with wildfire smoke.

A Land Of Giants

Amar Raavi posted a photo:

A Land Of Giants

A perspective view of a giant sequoia tree at Sequoia National Park, California, USA.

It was my first visit to Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks and they definitely surpassed my expectations by a huge margin. Not sure whether it's the giants or the fresh snow fall, but the scenery here on that day was simply stunning. I always used to think how minuscule we are, looking at a star filled sky. It's the same feeling I got when I saw these giants for the first time.

The sequoia national park in California

pierre_delage posted a photo:

The sequoia national park in California

Pines in the Clouds

vanalan posted a photo:

Pines in the Clouds

Redwood Canyon Trail, Sequoia National Park

H Polley posted a photo:

Redwood Canyon Trail, Sequoia National Park

Taken with very expired Kodak 400 Max film (exp. 2004), Nikon FM camera. That's it! Thanks to the Roll Film Week admins!

Redwood Canyon Trail, Sequoia National Park

H Polley posted a photo:

Redwood Canyon Trail, Sequoia National Park

Taken with very expired Kodak 400 Max film (exp. 2004), Nikon FM camera.