Death Valley National Park, California

Spanning a bit over 5270 square miles Death Valley National Park lies in two separate states which are Nevada and California. The park contains part of the Mojave Desert and is the biggest national park in the original 48 states. The park gets around 1 million visitors a year and became a national park on October 31, 1994. Some of the formations in the park are almost 2 billion years old ranging from sand dunes to mountains, canyons and valleys. The highest temperature ever recorded on earth was in Death Valley in 1913 at an astounding 134 F. Touring on roadways is a popular way to visit the park.

Death Valley National Park Info


Death Valley National Park

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News

Death Valley Burros Heading to New Homes

Burros from Death Valley National Park are headed towards sanctuaries and adoptive homes, through a major project the nonprofit Peaceful Valley Donkey Rescue starts on October 15, 2018. This project takes care of individual burros, allows native habitats to recover, and is funded entirely by donations.

Devils Hole Pupfish Population Reaches High

Wildlife biologists have good news to report about one of the world’s rarest fishes. Scientists counted 187 Devils Hole pupfish, which is the most they’ve observed in fifteen years.

Mosaic Canyon Road Closed for Upgrades to Stovepipe Wells

Death Valley National Park’s Mosaic Canyon Road is closed through June 30, 2019. The temporary closure is necessary due to safety concerns during a construction project on to increase the capacity of the Stovepipe Wells water system. The project includes excavating trenches and a large pit, and placing water pipes and a large tank.

Death Valley National Park Photos

Not Your Father's "Sailing Stone"

mzeissler posted a photo:

Not Your Father's "Sailing Stone"

According to Wikipedia, there are only a handful of locations around the world where "sailing stones" can be found -- including the famous Racetrack Playa within Death Valley National Park in the deep desert of southeastern California, and Little Bonnie Claire Playa in Nevada. There are a few others in Europe and South America, but they are tough to find.

This image is not from any of those places.

Instead, this "sailing stone" is from another location deep within Death Valley National Park -- which I will not pinpoint because of the threat of vandals and thieves. Suffice to say, I wanted to see some "sailing stones" during our visit there, but was totally stunned to see some in a totally different place, many many miles away from Racetrack Playa, but still within the confines of the park boundaries.

For Flickr fans, I'm pinning the geolocation at Racetrack, just so you know that it's within Death Valley.

Death Valley National Park
October 2016
Leica M3 + Voigtländer Ultron 21/1.8 ASPH II
Ilford Pan F Plus 50 + TMAX RS 4 minutes

It's Cold in California

Thomas Hawk posted a photo:

It's Cold in California

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

The Harmony Borax Works is located in Death Valley at Furnace Creek Springs, then called Greenland. It is now located within Death Valley National Park in Inyo County, California . It is on the National Register of Historic Places .

The Borax works are the remnants of what was once a Borax factory. The site features an old Borax dirt wagon and a 1200 gallon water wagon. Teams of twenty mules used to haul these bringing the dirt to the plant to be processed.

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

DSCN6813

JuneNY posted a photo:

DSCN6813

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

The Harmony Borax Works is a former ore processing plant located at the Death Valley National Park in California. The plant started operations in 1883 and shut down after five years. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

The Harmony Borax Works is a former ore processing plant located at the Death Valley National Park in California. The plant started operations in 1883 and shut down after five years. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

Furnace Creek Visitors Center

JuneNY posted a photo:

Furnace Creek Visitors Center

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

JuneNY posted a photo:

BORAX MUSEUM in Furnace Creek: (Death Valley National Park)

Harmony Borax Works

JuneNY posted a photo:

Harmony Borax Works

The Harmony Borax Works is a former ore processing plant located at the Death Valley National Park in California. The plant started operations in 1883 and shut down after five years. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.