Death Valley National Park, California

Spanning a bit over 5270 square miles Death Valley National Park lies in two separate states which are Nevada and California. The park contains part of the Mojave Desert and is the biggest national park in the original 48 states. The park gets around 1 million visitors a year and became a national park on October 31, 1994. Some of the formations in the park are almost 2 billion years old ranging from sand dunes to mountains, canyons and valleys. The highest temperature ever recorded on earth was in Death Valley in 1913 at an astounding 134 F. Touring on roadways is a popular way to visit the park.

Death Valley National Park Info


Death Valley National Park

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News

Death Valley National Park Invites Public to Christmas Bird Count

Death Valley National Park invites the public to a fun day outdoors counting birds on Friday, December 21. All skill levels are welcome for this opportunity to meet new people and learn about birds while contributing to a citizen-science effort continuing for over a hundred years.

Death Valley Burros Heading to New Homes

Burros from Death Valley National Park are headed towards sanctuaries and adoptive homes, through a major project the nonprofit Peaceful Valley Donkey Rescue starts on October 15, 2018. This project takes care of individual burros, allows native habitats to recover, and is funded entirely by donations.

Devils Hole Pupfish Population Reaches High

Wildlife biologists have good news to report about one of the world’s rarest fishes. Scientists counted 187 Devils Hole pupfish, which is the most they’ve observed in fifteen years.

Death Valley National Park Photos

Death Valley Rain

Rick Whitacre posted a photo:

Death Valley Rain

The Geminid Meteor Shower rains down on Death Valley as seen from Zabriskie Point

Comet Wirtanen is visible in the upper left, below and to the left of Pleiades

Sony A7S, Rokinon 14mm f/2.8, 14mm, f/2.8, 20 seconds, ISO12,800. Stacked 27 exposures with meteors onto a stack of 42 exposures for a clean foreground

Zabriskie Point Before Dawn

Mimi Ditchie posted a photo:

Zabriskie Point Before Dawn

After many sunrises at Zabriskie I've found that I like the light before sunrise to be the best. It takes on pastel colors and is beautiful even without clouds.

_DSC2090

brett.whitelaw posted a photo:

_DSC2090

Sorry for the lack of postings, lately, things have been busy. Here’s a shot from Zabriskie Point in Death Valley, California, during a road trip last February. I’ve heard the topography of Death Valley described as something from another planet, and I can certainly see that. There are tons of beautiful colors in the rock formations all around the park as well as salt flats that are the lowest point in North America. We only had one day there and it was certainly not long enough to see all the bizarre wonders of the park.

2018 Geminid Rain in the Desert

Marsha Kirschbaum posted a photo:

2018 Geminid Rain in the Desert

© 2018 Marsha Kirschbaum

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, CA (Rescan)

Ted Truex posted a photo:

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, CA (Rescan)

Canon EOS-1n. 24-105mm f/4, Kodak TMAX 100, TMAX 1:4 @ 7:30s, scanned with Nikon CoolScan 9000 ED

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, CA (Rescan)

Ted Truex posted a photo:

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, CA (Rescan)

Canon EOS-1n. 24-105mm f/4, Kodak TMAX 100, TMAX 1:4 @ 7:30s, scanned with Nikon CoolScan 9000 ED

Death Valley at sunset

sang chung posted a photo:

Death Valley at sunset

Death Valley at sunset

sang chung posted a photo:

Death Valley at sunset

Road to Badwater

alessandrorossini.org posted a photo:

Road to Badwater

Thanks for your faves and comments!
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Sunset at The Ranch

alessandrorossini.org posted a photo:

Sunset at The Ranch

Thanks for your faves and comments!
See my Photostream.
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DJI_0153

phlog posted a photo:

DJI_0153

Red Cinder, Black Cinder

Kirk Lougheed posted a photo:

Red Cinder, Black Cinder

Death Valley, California

Looking across to the far rim of the crater Little Hebe and thence to the eroded badlands beyond. The melange of red and black cinder and pulverised light colored sedimentary rock was thrown up by an explosion when magma got too close to some underground water.

Artist's palette drive

raffaele pagani posted a photo:

Artist's palette drive

Death Valley

Artist's palette drive

raffaele pagani posted a photo:

Artist's palette drive

Death Valley

Artist's palette drive

raffaele pagani posted a photo:

Artist's palette drive

Death Valley

Artist's palette drive

raffaele pagani posted a photo:

Artist's palette drive

Death Valley

Artist's palette drive

raffaele pagani posted a photo:

Artist's palette drive

Death Valley

Artist's palette drive

raffaele pagani posted a photo:

Artist's palette drive

Death Valley

Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes

alessandrorossini.org posted a photo:

Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes

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Roadrunner

Kirk Lougheed posted a photo:

Roadrunner

Furnace Creek, Death Valley, California

A curious roadrunner gives me the eye. These long-tailed ground birds are found in the deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico. They are omnivorous, living on insects, small reptiles, rodents, small birds, and fruits and nuts. As the name indicates they can run fast, up to 20 mph (32 km/h).

This particular roadrunner was hanging out near the golf course at Furnace Creek, probably more for the insects than anything else. I was chatting with another photographer when he appeared. He was curious about us, strutting around while we photographed him. He eventually flew to the top of a rail fence and perched there for a while before hopping down and wandering off.

My childhood introduction to the Roadrunner, thanks to Warner Brothers: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jd_41tM6H2Y

Explored December 15, 2018