Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Lake Clark National Park is in the southern part of Alaska and the closest city is the capital Anchorage. It was established as a national park on December 2, 1980. The park covers an area of 6297 square miles and around 12,000 vistors attend the park each year. The park contains an abundance lakes, rivers, parts of several mountain ranges, glaciers, a rainforest, an alpine tundra, and also some volcanoes. Only one of the volcanoes in the park is active and it is named Redoubt. Redoubt has erupted a couple times in the past three decades. The waterways in park are key to the health of the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon fishery which is the biggest one on the planet on the planet. The park is always open but the most popular times to visit are between June and September.

Lake Clark National Park Info


Lake Clark National Park

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News

New Study Shows High Salmon Use in Wolf Diets in Southwest Alaska

Port Alsworth, AK – A new study shows wolves in Southwest Alaska are using a diversity of food resources to meet their dietary needs, including a high use of salmon and salmon carcasses. The study was published in the August 2017 issue of Canadian Journal of Zoology. The study also found a possible increase in wolf pack stability in packs making regular use of salmon as a food resource.

Subsistence Resource Council Meeting, October 2017

The Lake Clark National Park SRC will meet from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. or until business is completed on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, at the Port Alsworth Community Center on Flight Line Road in Port Alsworth, AK 99653. There will be a community luncheon prior to the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

National Park Service Celebrates Dedication of the Jay S. Hammond Wilderness Area

The National Park Service dedicated the Jay S. Hammond Wilderness Area yesterday in a ceremony that celebrated Governor Hammond’s contributions to Alaska and the Hammond family’s legacy at Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. Former First Lady of Alaska, Bella Hammond, her daughter Heidi Hammond, and granddaughter Lauren Stanford attended.

Lake Clark National Park Photos

postcard - Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Jassy-50 posted a photo:

postcard - Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

... sashimi ...

Grandpops Woodlice posted a photo:

... sashimi ...

Coastal Brown Bear Cub In Stream Looking For Salmon (Ursus arctos)

Susan Roehl posted a photo:

Coastal Brown Bear Cub In Stream Looking For Salmon (Ursus arctos)

Alaska
Lake Clark National Park
USA

Young coastal brown bear down at the salmon stream fishing for salmon. Due to the fact that we were not allowed to get too close to the bears we were photographing, we could not get close enough to actually see the bear in the stream, just the upper half of its body which could be seen above the stream embankment. An image of a female brown bear in the stream can be seen in the first comment section.

“Brown bears” typically live along the southern coast of Alaska where they have access to seasonally abundant spawning salmon. The coastal areas also provide a rich array of vegetation they can use as food as well as a milder climate. This allows them to grow larger and live in higher densities than their “grizzly” cousins in the northern and interior parts of the state.

The brown bear resembles its close relatives the black bear (U. americanus) and the polar bear (U. maritimus). Brown bears are usually larger than black bears, have a more prominent shoulder hump, less prominent ears, and longer, straighter claws. The varying shapes of these bears are adaptations to their particular life styles. Long claws are useful in digging roots or excavating small mammals, but are not efficient for climbing trees. The musculature and bone structure of the hump are adaptations for digging and for attaining bursts of speed necessary for capture of moose or caribou. Color is not a reliable key in differentiating these bears because black and brown bears have many color phases.

Brown bears are very adaptable and like humans, they consume a wide variety of foods. Common foods include salmon, berries, grasses, sedges, cow parsnip, ground squirrels, carrion, and roots. In many parts of Alaska, brown bears are capable predators of moose and caribou, especially newborns.

They have developed a complex language and social structure to express their feelings and minimize serious fights These feeding concentration areas also provide opportunities for people to watch bears. There are approximately 32,000 brown bears living in Alaska.

Wild Sea Otter In Cooks Inlet, Alaska (Enhydra lutris)

Susan Roehl posted a photo:

Wild Sea Otter In Cooks Inlet, Alaska (Enhydra lutris)

Alaska
Cooks Inlet
Duck Island
Lake Clark National Park

This sea otter was swimming close to our boat when we visited Duck Island just north of Chisik Island on Cooks Inlet where puffins were nesting. The guide said for some reason this one spent its time by itself instead of being with other otters which was normal. The otter seemed to want attention as it swam near the boat as close as possible. It would groom itself in the water and at first it seemed to be ok with our presence until we got too close.

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a marine mammal native to the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (31 and 99 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals. Unlike most marine mammals, the sea otter's primary form of insulation is an exceptionally thick coat of fur, the densest in the animal kingdom. Although it can walk on land, the sea otter lives mostly in the ocean.

The sea otter inhabits offshore environments, where it dives to the sea floor to forage. It preys mostly on marine invertebrates such as sea urchins, various molluscs and crustaceans, and some species of fish. Its foraging and eating habits are noteworthy in several respects. First, its use of rocks to dislodge prey and to open shells makes it one of the few mammal species to use tools. In most of its range, it is a keystone species, controlling sea urchin populations which would otherwise inflict extensive damage to kelp forest ecosystems. Its diet includes prey species that are also valued by humans as food, leading to conflicts between sea otters and fisheries.

Sea otters, whose numbers were once estimated at 150,000–300,000, were hunted extensively for their fur between 1741 and 1911, and the world population fell to 1,000–2,000 individuals living in a fraction of their historic range. A subsequent international ban on hunting, conservation efforts, and reintroduction programs into previously populated areas have contributed to numbers rebounding, and the species now occupies about two-thirds of its former range.- Wikipedia.

Horned Puffin (Fratercula corniculata)

Susan Roehl posted a photo:

Horned Puffin (Fratercula corniculata)

Alaska
Cooks Inlet
Duck Island
Lake Clark National Park

This Horned Puffin image was taken on Duck Island in Cooks Inlet in Alaska. The island is used by several sea birds during mating season. The horned puffin is one of just three Puffin subspecies. The other puffin on the island is the tufted puffin. The third type of puffin is the Atlantic Puffin over near Europe. They are extremely fast flyers and live the rest of their lives out on the open sea diving for fish. Another image of a horned puffin can be seen in the first comment section.

The horned puffin (Fratercula corniculata) is an auk, similar in appearance to the Atlantic puffin; this bird's bill is yellow at the base and red at the tip. It is a pelagic seabird that feeds primarily by diving for fish. It nests in colonies, often with other auks.

The yellow bill plate grows before the breeding season and is shed later. They have a small fleshy black "horn" above their eyes.

This species breeds on rocky islands off the coasts of Siberia, Alaska and British Columbia, in burrows, in rocky cavities or among rocks. It winters far out to sea. Feeding areas are usually located fairly far offshore from the nest. There is usually one chick and both parents feed the young.

Horned puffins will return from hunting with several small fish in their beaks. They also eat squid and crustaceans.

The population of these birds has declined due to the introduction of rats onto some islands used for nesting. Info: Wikipedia

I need a hug

SF knitter posted a photo:

I need a hug

I think this cub wasn't quite sure what to do with his paws.

... A Blonde Moment ...

Grandpops Woodlice posted a photo:

... A Blonde Moment ...

After a long three year wait for my trip to Alaska, I finally made it !! I have a couple of images to sort through !!! This is a female called Blondie, she is fishing for a Coho dinner to feed to her two cubs.

Big Momma!

avilacats posted a photo:

Big Momma!

Always alert when her cubs are nearby;
Brown bear, Lake Clark National Park, AK

Lookout practice

SF knitter posted a photo:

Lookout practice

Cuteness overload watching cubs play. This is one of Agro's three cubs.

Trying to keep an eye on triplets is hard work

SF knitter posted a photo:

Trying to keep an eye on triplets is hard work

We got to see two different sets of cubs while visiting a small area of Lake Clark National park. This was Agro and her three cubs.

It was so much fun watching the 3 cubs play. But the fun was balanced out with some drama the next day. We were cruising on the beach when our guide spotted a bear running. As we got closer, we realized it was a cub without its mother. Our guide quickly checked the meadow, and Agro was there with only 2 cubs. The cub was running in the wrong direction!

Heartbroken, we decided to leave Agro alone in hopes that she would eventually find her cub. The other lodge instructed all the other groups to leave Agro alone.

Fortunately, the next morning had a happy ending. We spotted Agro with 3 cubs.

The lost cub is that darker cub on the right (I think).

Bored with it all!

avilacats posted a photo:

Bored with it all!

After trotting into the area at a full clip, this big boar yawned and decided to take a load off! He must have had a full tummy.
Lake Clark National Park, AK

Keep your distance

SF knitter posted a photo:

Keep your distance

This boar (ie male) obviously has seen some harsh fights. He doesn't have a nickname, although someone did call him Scarface.

Nothing cute and cuddly here. He looks pretty menacing, and he was just grazing on grass.

BTW, cropped, not super severely, but cropped.

Special connection!

avilacats posted a photo:

Special connection!

It was very late in the evening and we were ready to call it a day when these two young bears (siblings?) appeared on the beach and proceeded to entertain us with their playful bear antics!

Brown Bears; Lake Clark National Park & Preserve, AK

Whomp!

SF knitter posted a photo:

Whomp!

They go from being companionably ambling along the beach to rough housing in a blink.

Juveniles

“Blonde Mom” and her spring cubs (EXPLORE)

avilacats posted a photo:

“Blonde Mom” and her spring cubs (EXPLORE)

Evening at Silver Salmon Creek,
Lake Clark National Park & Preserve
Alaska

Syncronized

SF knitter posted a photo:

Syncronized

Two juvenile Alaskan brown bears making their way across the beach at low tide.

Looking regal!

avilacats posted a photo:

Looking regal!

Bald eagles; Lake Clark National Park and Preserve—Alaska

A slice of Paradise

SF knitter posted a photo:

A slice of Paradise

This is the lodge we stayed at while visiting Alaska. It was so lovely and comfortable there. Plus, all the cooking and cleaning were done for us! (The food was amazing.)

Bald eagle’s domain

avilacats posted a photo:

Bald eagle’s domain

Lake Clark National Park, AK

Catching up with mom! (EXPLORE)

avilacats posted a photo:

Catching up with mom! (EXPLORE)

Coastal brown bear cubs; Lake Clark National Park, AK