Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Lake Clark National Park is in the southern part of Alaska and the closest city is the capital Anchorage. It was established as a national park on December 2, 1980. The park covers an area of 6297 square miles and around 12,000 vistors attend the park each year. The park contains an abundance lakes, rivers, parts of several mountain ranges, glaciers, a rainforest, an alpine tundra, and also some volcanoes. Only one of the volcanoes in the park is active and it is named Redoubt. Redoubt has erupted a couple times in the past three decades. The waterways in park are key to the health of the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon fishery which is the biggest one on the planet on the planet. The park is always open but the most popular times to visit are between June and September.

Lake Clark National Park Info


Lake Clark National Park

Warning: strtotime(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /var/www/vhosts/explorenationalparks.org/httpdocs/lib/model/parks.php on line 190

News

National Park Service Celebrates Dedication of the Jay S. Hammond Wilderness Area

The National Park Service dedicated the Jay S. Hammond Wilderness Area yesterday in a ceremony that celebrated Governor Hammond’s contributions to Alaska and the Hammond family’s legacy at Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. Former First Lady of Alaska, Bella Hammond, her daughter Heidi Hammond, and granddaughter Lauren Stanford attended.

Lake Clark National Park Opens a Second Public Use Cabin in an Historic Prospector’s Log Home

Anchorage, AK – Lake Clark National Park and Preserve opened its second public use cabin on October 22, 2019. The historic Joe Thompson cabin is at the base of the newly revitalized Portage Creek Trail on the north shore of Lake Clark about thirteen miles from Port Alsworth, Alaska. This is an opportunity for park visitors to step into the shoes of a mid-century cabin builder, prospector, and commercial fisherman – stay in his cabin, hike the trail towards his prospect, and explore the Lake Clark country he lived in for forty years.

Extreme Fire Danger: Lake Clark National Park and Preserve encourages caution with use of campfires and to report new wildfires

Port Alsworth, Alaska –Fire danger in Lake Clark and Iliamna Lake region is extreme as prolonged hot, dry and windy weather has dried park vegetation. These conditions mean that given an ignition source, new fires may readily start and spread quickly. Smoky conditions are widespread throughout the park as smoke moves in from distant fires.

Lake Clark National Park Photos

Tanaina Glacier

Prairie Star posted a photo:

Tanaina Glacier

Lake Clark national park & preserve, Alaska

Do eagles snore?

SF knitter posted a photo:

Do eagles snore?

We saw this eagle perched in a tree, so we took a break from trying to find bears to photograph it. As we focused in, we noticed it was asleep! Not very bold or elegant looking here, haha.

Happy Whimsical Wednesday! Who thought a bald eagle could look whimsical?

following

Drew Hamilton posted a photo:

following

chilling

Drew Hamilton posted a photo:

chilling

clamming

Drew Hamilton posted a photo:

clamming

Grizzly Mom & Cub

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Grizzly Mom & Cub

A grizzly (coastal brown bear) yearling cub sits and watches while momma munches on the sedge grass and keeps a lookout. It's the rut and males can be a deadly problem for the cub, so they both kept an eye open for any dangers. I watched these two for quite a while as they ate, played, and rested.

Taken 5 June 2019 at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska.

"As The Fur Flies"

Joseph M. Campbell posted a photo:

"As The Fur Flies"

Intense Concentration

Glatz Nature Photography posted a photo:

Intense Concentration

Female Coastal Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) in pursuit of a Salmon. We are heading back to Alaska in July. So anxious to see and film one of our favorite species again. This is a re - edit of an image taken on our first salmon run trip in 2012. Absolutely love the action of Brown Bears fishing for salmon. Very exciting to watch these huge, powerful and FAST bears crashing though the water.

Claw Biting

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Claw Biting

This coastal brown bear yearling is rolling on the ground and chomping on its claws while giving a glance in my direction. Probably looking to see what's making that shutter sound as the cameras click away around me, capturing some endearing moments in the life this young cub. Momma bear was very close by during this.

Taken 5 June 2019 at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska.

Grass Munching Momma

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Grass Munching Momma

This Coastal Brown (Grizzly) Sow munches on sedge grass while her yearling cub takes a breather. Besides clams, the sedge grass is one of their main food sources when they come down from their dens in early June.

Taken 5 June 2019 at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

... MUM ...

Grandpops Woodlice posted a photo:

... MUM ...

Fishing for salmon to feed the nippers, she had three young in tow.
Sliver Salmon Creek, Lake Clark National Park. Alaska

Grizzly Sow Mug Shot

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Grizzly Sow Mug Shot

I had a very close encounter with this wild Coastal Brown (Grizzly) bear at Lake Clark National Park in Alaska. The guide almost sprayed her as she was too close and wasn't looking like she would retreat. Of course I had mixed feelings about being this close (less than 20 feet) to a wild bear but these bears are somewhat used to people being there.

There are hints of green around the mouth - that from eating the green sedge grass which is a major staple in their diet in June.

Taken 5 June 2019 at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska.

Muzzle to Muzzle

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Muzzle to Muzzle

This coastal brown (grizzly) sow and her yearling are both fascinated by something going on in the distance, probably watching the antics of another bear as there were many bears around.

In this image you can definitely see the "hump" on the back of the sow, which are muscles that give the grizzly additional strength for digging. This hump is not present on black bears and is a differentiation tool to determine what kind of bear you have.

Taken 5 June 2019 at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska.

Just curious...

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Just curious...

This Coastal Brown sow saunters close to our group near Bear Camp on the Katmai. She knows we're there but tries to ignore us by not looking at us directly. This was the second closest bear encounter our group had and our guide was seconds away from releasing bear spray to move her away from our group after she came within yards of us. Thankfully, no spray was released. But, wow!

No crop at all for this image. In fact I was busy pulling the lens in to get more of the bear in the image. I'm headed out for a while, so I'll leave you with this image for a bit ;)

Taken 5 June 2019 at Bear Camp, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

I'm back here mom...

danielusescanon posted a photo:

I'm back here mom...

Late May early June the coastal brown bears come down from the mountains to eat the sedge grass and mate. The cubs that are present are yearlings, born last year. The sows that have just given birth avoid this time as the boars might kill their young. They come down later when its safe.

Here a sow and her cub have eaten their fill of the grass and are watching something in the distance. The sow still has a blade of grass sticking from her mouth, much like a tooth pic, while her cub places its paw on her rump. I found this pose to be rather amusing as I oftentimes wonder about the behavior we see. Is the cub just letting her know it's still there or just wants contact with mom?

Taken 5 June 2019 at Bear Camp, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Shake it, shake it, but don't break it...

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Shake it, shake it, but don't break it...

This female Coastal Brown (Grizzly) Bear is making quite a splash half way across this river and throwing quite a bit of water around as she shakes her head vigorously! Yes, there is a bear in there... I watched this sow enter the river and play in the water for a bit before she crossed back over.

Taken 5 June 2019 at Bear Camp, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Who's Afraid of a Big Bad Bear?

raptor wack posted a photo:

Who's Afraid of a Big Bad Bear?

Me for one.

A ranger and bear expert told us the only thing a Grizzly Bear is afraid of.
It's a bigger Grizzly. So if you see a big bad bear looking back over his shoulder, it's best if you look and take note too.

One thing I did notice about this Coastal Brown Bear is its' claws. Apparently enough time on the beach digging for clams gives a bear very, very shiny nails.

Thanks for stopping by.
Have a great day.
Brown bear_6100

Fast Approaching...

danielusescanon posted a photo:

Fast Approaching...

If a grizzly runs at you like this, you might be in for a world of hurt, but in this case the grizzly wasn't attacking but drying off. This sow had just come out of the water and apparently this is how it works to get the water off.

Taken 3 June 2019 Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Fortress Mama Bear

Glatz Nature Photography posted a photo:

Fortress Mama Bear

These are the first Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) cubs we ever saw in the wild. We visited this spot many times in the future, and saw this mother bear raise 2 or 3 additional litters. Re-edit of the original image.

Follow That Splash

Glatz Nature Photography posted a photo:

Follow That Splash

Big female Coastal Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishes the shallows. She's already caught and consumed several large salmon (note the blood stains on her mouth). We thought she was done for the evening - until we saw the splash. And she was right on it, catching yet another fish. Amazing how fast and agile these bears are.